Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 11, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Rich Mountain (West Virginia, United States) or search for Rich Mountain (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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pany C. 23d Va. Reg't, mortally wounded, at Carrick's Ford; lived 12 hours. Private Jones, Company A, 23d Va. Reg't, mortally wounded, at Carrick's Ford; lived 6 hours. Serg'nt Pierson, Company I, 23d Va. Reg't after amputation of leg, at Rich Mountain. Private Bagby, Company D, 20th Va. Reg't, after amputation of thigh, at Rich Mountain. Private Wm. H. Campbell, Greenbrier Cavalry, wounded through arm and chest, (accidental,) near Beverly. [Signed,] Wm. A. Carrington, Late Sually wounded, at Carrick's Ford; lived 12 hours. Private Jones, Company A, 23d Va. Reg't, mortally wounded, at Carrick's Ford; lived 6 hours. Serg'nt Pierson, Company I, 23d Va. Reg't after amputation of leg, at Rich Mountain. Private Bagby, Company D, 20th Va. Reg't, after amputation of thigh, at Rich Mountain. Private Wm. H. Campbell, Greenbrier Cavalry, wounded through arm and chest, (accidental,) near Beverly. [Signed,] Wm. A. Carrington, Late Surgeon 23d Va. Volunteers.
Major Haskins, late a lieutenant in the Buckingham Lee Guards. of Rich Mountain fame, arrived in the Danville train yesterday afternoon, bringing with him as a prisoner a Dutchman recently arrested in Bedford county. This prisoner is a miserable wretch in appearance, and ought to feel thankful that he has now a prospect of getting something to eat and perhaps to wear. He is stolid, ignorant really or feignedly, cannot or will not disclose his name, and is altogether an unpromising liegeman of his Royal Highness Abraham I. The prisoner declared that he had been a member of the Baltimore Blues. He gave no intelligible account of the manner in which he got into Bedford; but a vowed his purpose to fight against the Confederacy, for which purpose he was endeavoring to make his way to the Potomac, beyond Manassas. He was sent to prison in this city, Major Haskins continues in the service, notwithstanding his regiment is to be mustered out to-day.
The 20th Regiment. --This Regiment, which was commanded by Colonel Pegram at Rich Mountain, and about 600 of which were taken prisoners, is, we learn, to be mustered out of service to-day. The six hundred taken prisoners were discharged upon their parole not to fight against Lincoln's Government until they were exchanged for Lincoln prisoners taken by the Confederate army.
The Daily Dispatch: September 11, 1861., [Electronic resource], Franklin, Pendleton co., Aug. 28, 1861. (search)
Franklin, Pendleton co., Aug. 28, 1861. We have occasionally during this war exhibitions of self-reliance and determination amongst our people that are worthy of being handed down to posterity. Away from the centres of excitement, and, we may say, of information, we find men ready and willing to sacrifice all in defence of our State. Such is the affair we now give, and vouch for its truthfulness. When the unfortunate affair of Rich Mountain was over, and Garnett's army had retreated into our Valley, the whole western portion of our county was exposed to the inroads of the thieving Hessians. That portion of the county was full of cattle, and hence the desire of the enemy to possess it. Soon after the enemy had possession of Beverly, news came of their advance by the Seneca Pass, and of their ravages on Dry. Fork and Shaver's Mountain. Then it was that a heroic band of mountaineers — we wish we could give their names — under the leadership of Allen White, numbering a