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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,126 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 528 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 402 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 296 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 246 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 230 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 214 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 180 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 174 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 170 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 11, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) or search for North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

rity of numbers and of armament at Hatteras Inlet is the exception to the general rule; but it does not take away from the merit of precision and the skill which has distinguished our troops and naval officers throughout this and every engagement since the war began, wherever there were competent commanders in charge. In hand-to-hand fighting, and in the use of cannon, as well as in the rifle, the North has established its superiority, and the result of the recent action on the coast of North Carolina will be to give increased confidence to our troops, and show the Powers of Europe that they ought not to arrive at hasty conclusions from the disaster at Bull Run." The Yankee ships during the present war have repeatedly engaged our batteries on shore — at Sewell'pand Pig's points, at Aquia creek, at Mathias' point and elsewhere. Yet, until the affair at Hatteras, they never succeeded in killing or crippling a single man, while our men slaughtered them by wholesale. At Hatteras,
An M. C. From North Carolina. Among all the instances of rascality that the war has developed, nothing has exceeded the proceedings of one C. H. Foster, who, after narrowly escaping popular vengeance in North Carolina, fled to the North, and is now going about that region proclaiming himself a member of Lincoln's Congress, eNorth Carolina, fled to the North, and is now going about that region proclaiming himself a member of Lincoln's Congress, elected by Union men in North Carolina. Had, this man one spark of decency in his composition, his wife's denunciation, lately published, would scarcely have appeared; but he is doubtless the smallest of all the diminutive souls who have taken advantage of the war to make themselves famous. He is lower than Carlile or Pierpont. North Carolina. Had, this man one spark of decency in his composition, his wife's denunciation, lately published, would scarcely have appeared; but he is doubtless the smallest of all the diminutive souls who have taken advantage of the war to make themselves famous. He is lower than Carlile or Pierpont. Foster is a native Yankee.
of Tomlinson & McLaughlin, the deputy marshal found about $9,000 worth of tobacco, selling on commission for a Virginia seceder. L. T. Hughes, off Columbia street, between Main and Walnut, acknowledges having in his possession a large amount of money, the proceeds of sales of Southern goods — probably $10,000. J. C. Butler on Columbia street, between Vine and Race, acknowledged having $300 in money and $700 worth of peach brandy, that belonged to an inhabitant of Dixie's land. The North Carolina coast. The Wilmington Journal, of Monday evening, thus alludes to the vessels seen off Fort Macon on Saturday last: Official information received here states that four of the enemy's fleet had anchored off Fort Macon by seven o'clock on last Saturday evening. Nothing later has been heard from that point. It is evident that the Federal Navy keeps hovering along our coast, and we can hardly say where it may attempt to make a descent. Our people in this section had better be o