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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 172 16 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 152 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 120 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 113 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 107 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 106 6 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 106 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 102 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 89 15 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 68 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 20, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Fremont or search for Fremont in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

without sheets or hats, and with coats and pants curtailed of their fair proportions, but who can whip with case double the number of Hessians who may dare in encounter them. They are a breed of warriors, the like of which was never seen. A few hundred of them are holding Southwestern Missouri against Fremont and all his hosts. The response of Gen. Jeff. to Fremont's proclamation is a model document. Napoleon never excelled it. We confess a special admiration of the great Guerilla Chief. without sheets or hats, and with coats and pants curtailed of their fair proportions, but who can whip with case double the number of Hessians who may dare in encounter them. They are a breed of warriors, the like of which was never seen. A few hundred of them are holding Southwestern Missouri against Fremont and all his hosts. The response of Gen. Jeff. to Fremont's proclamation is a model document. Napoleon never excelled it. We confess a special admiration of the great Guerilla Chief.
Lincoln's Instructions to Fremont. --President Lincoln transmitted a letter to General Fremont on the 12th inst., on the subject of his recent proclamation. He says: "Assuming that you, being on the ground, could better judge of the necessities of your position than I could at this distance, on seeing your proclamation of the 30th of August I perceive several objections to it, the particular objection being the clauses relative to the confiscation of property and the liberation of General Fremont on the 12th inst., on the subject of his recent proclamation. He says: "Assuming that you, being on the ground, could better judge of the necessities of your position than I could at this distance, on seeing your proclamation of the 30th of August I perceive several objections to it, the particular objection being the clauses relative to the confiscation of property and the liberation of slaves. It is objectionable on account of its non-conformity to the act of Congress. On the 8th of August last I wrote you expressing a wish that that clause should be modified. Your answer expressed a preference that I should make an open order for the modification, which I cheerfully do. It is therefore ordered, that the said clause be modified, held and construed to conform to and not transcend the provisions in the act of Congress, entitled an act to confiscate property used for ins
f Southern men in the Northern cities. We are rejoiced that the Confederate Government have, in this magnificent lot of tobacco, a fund sufficient to cover a very large portion of the recent Yankee confiscations at the North. Auguste Belmont is a well known banker in Wall street — the same whom Secretary Chase recently sent over to London to attempt a negotiation of the Federal war loan, and who met with a signal failure. A. Belmont is also the intimate friend and financial agent of Gen. Fremont, and is doubtless a sympathizer in that officer's brutal measures in Missouri. We have no doubt that the Confederate Receiver under the sequestration act, Mr. Giles, will look promptly after this tobacco of Belmont. Belmont is the American agent of the Rothchilds; but is the leading member and probably one of the wealthiest men of that house. He may attempt the device of pretending that the tobacco is really not his own, but is the property of the European Rothchilds. Such a preten