Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 20, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Lee or search for Lee in all documents.

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Runaway --$20 Reward.--Ranaway from the farm at Bermuda Hundred, a servant man named Lee. He is a bright mulatto, with a slight affection of one eye; very stout, and walks very awkwardly; about 35 years old. The above reward will be paid if taken out of the county, and $10 if taken in the county, and delivered to the overseer on the farm. H. Carrington Watkins, For the Executor. Chesterfield, Sept. 1861. se 19--6t*
Gen. Lee. --Referring to the military situation in Western Virginia, the Enquirer pays the following just tribute to Gen. Lee: Whatever the result, it is probably already decided. If the victory which military critics pronounce certain — Gen. Lee: Whatever the result, it is probably already decided. If the victory which military critics pronounce certain — the unavoidable casualties of battle only excepted — shall indeed crown the monument of Gen. Lee, we shall greatly rejoice for our country's sake. But we shall do more; we shall rejoice for Gen. Lee's sake. Hither to his duties have kept him in hisGen. Lee, we shall greatly rejoice for our country's sake. But we shall do more; we shall rejoice for Gen. Lee's sake. Hither to his duties have kept him in his closet. The good which he was doing, the people could not know. Going to the rescue where our fortunes were darkest, he has, if present anticipations be realised, given us proofs of what generalship can do. He has certainly inspired his own men wiGen. Lee's sake. Hither to his duties have kept him in his closet. The good which he was doing, the people could not know. Going to the rescue where our fortunes were darkest, he has, if present anticipations be realised, given us proofs of what generalship can do. He has certainly inspired his own men with the utmost ardor and enthusiasm. He has circumvented the enemy, has taken their General, reduced them to privation, and cut off their supplies and their retreat. If now he forces them to surrender without a blow, it will stand a monument to his <
More prisoners. --The Central train brought down yesterday fifteen prisoners from Manassas, sixty-seven from Gen. Lee's command, and one man arrested as a spy, and sent hither from Huntersville. Quite a crowd gathered around Gen. Lee's prisoners, these being the first sent down by him, and some persons entered into conversation with them. One of our German citizens amused the by-standers very much by his comic remarks, and enjoyed his own jokes as much as anybody else did. These prisonerGen. Lee's prisoners, these being the first sent down by him, and some persons entered into conversation with them. One of our German citizens amused the by-standers very much by his comic remarks, and enjoyed his own jokes as much as anybody else did. These prisoners are from the Northwestern States--chiefly from Ohio — and were taken in a skirmish between two Tennessee regiments, under Col. Savage, and a smaller Federal force, near Kircher's (or Crrutcher's) Orchard — a point somewhere between Big Spring and Huttonsville. They were marched to the military prison, followed by a number of curious spectator
The remains of Col. John A. Washington, one of Gen. Lee's staff, who was killed while out on a late scouting expedition, having daringly ridden up within a very short distance of the Federal pickets, arrived in this city on the Central cars yesterday.
From Gen. Lee's command. --D. J. McConnel, Esq., arrived in this city on yesterday from Gen. Lee's command on Monday last, up to which time no such occurrence had transpired as reported in the city on Wednesday. He reports the troops in good health and spirits. From Gen. Lee's command. --D. J. McConnel, Esq., arrived in this city on yesterday from Gen. Lee's command on Monday last, up to which time no such occurrence had transpired as reported in the city on Wednesday. He reports the troops in good health and spirits.
en brier River,Pocahontas co.Va., Sept, 17, 1861, On the 19th inst., five regiments from Gen. Jackson's command--Cols. Rust's, Johnson's, Scott's, Hansborough's, and Fullerton's --left Camp Bartow, ostensibly for the purpose of reinforcing Gen. Lee, who, report said, was about closing in on the Yankees at Huttonsville. After a few hours' march, however, by the Huntersville road, the gladsome joy of joining so able a General as the invincible Lee was changed to the more gloomy reflections g definitely. We may go to Petersburg. The health of troops here is as good as can be expected, when so many are assembled at one point, our regiment being, I believe, from the change of climate the greatest sufferers. The news from General Lee is encouraging. He has driven them behind their entrenchments, and takes all who dare to venture out. The ball is rolling vigorously in Western Virginia. Expect, ere long, to hear the reverberation of glad mountain shouts. More anon.