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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 692 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 516 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 418 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War 358 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 298 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 230 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 190 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 186 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 182 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 28, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for France (France) or search for France (France) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 3 document sections:

rly and successful conclusion, they would then turn their attention to the Canada, and make their next morning's meal of those provinces. They abused England and France in the most outrageous manner for their mere mentality, and threatened vengeance upon all the world if it did not at once pay obstance to their Yankee Government,g from this vulgar Yankee hue and cry. The real motive to this energetic preparation for the contingency of war with the North is obvious. Great Britain and France will be compelled sooner or later to raise the blockade, which excludes them from our tobacco and cotton. They will be compelled to recognize, and to open relatieat Britain to take measures which are likely to bring her in collision with the North; and they account at the same time, for the delay of that Government and of France in announcing their recognition of the Southern Confederacy. The English Government, with the powerful alliance of the London Times, have already brought pub
Our Commissioners to England and France. It is known that Hon. John Slidell, of Louisiana, has been appointed Commissioner of the Confederate States to France, and that Hon. James M. Mason, of Virginia, has been deputed as Commissioner to England. We learn that those gentlemen, with their Secretary of Legation, and their families, have some days ago sent forward their baggage and will soon set out themselves to the courts which they have been deputed. We hear that they will take the routerate States to France, and that Hon. James M. Mason, of Virginia, has been deputed as Commissioner to England. We learn that those gentlemen, with their Secretary of Legation, and their families, have some days ago sent forward their baggage and will soon set out themselves to the courts which they have been deputed. We hear that they will take the route by Tampico, and cross the ocean on one of the British steamers that mode of transit being the only one of absolute security for them open.
ld be no casus belli, and, if it were, the LincolnGovernment, despite the blustering talk of the New York Herald, could not be kicked into a war at this time with France or England. We ought to be content that the foreign powers have declared strict neutrality between the two sections. --As to their active aid, we either need it do it; if we can, they need not. It would be a far prouder reflection that we had achieved our own deliverance, than that we had to be aided in it by England and France. The moral influence of an unassisted triumph upon the pride and self-reliance of our own people, would be incalculable. We want to be under no obligations to Esupercilious people in the Old World. We believe that the South is at this moment the most military nation in the world, not even excepting gallant and chivalric France; we believe that the soldiers of the Southern army, led by a Napoleon, can conquer any equal number of men in all Christendom. We know that our agricultural reso