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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 172 16 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 152 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 120 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 113 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 107 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 106 6 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 106 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 102 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 89 15 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 68 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 1, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Fremont or search for Fremont in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 3 document sections:

A good joke on Fremont. --A gentleman who had returned to Arkansas from a visit to St. Louis, communicates to an Arkansas paper a good joke on General Fremont, who, it seems, got up, mounted and equipped a body of troops as a special body guard; their horses were superior, and their arms and appointments of the finest descripGeneral Fremont, who, it seems, got up, mounted and equipped a body of troops as a special body guard; their horses were superior, and their arms and appointments of the finest description. He was proud of it. It was to be his pet. But one day this fine body went out to perform sundry evolutions at about two miles from the city, and they never came back. They were last heard of in General Hardee's camp, where they accidentally found their way, If any one wants to see Fremont mad, it is only necessary to mentioas to be his pet. But one day this fine body went out to perform sundry evolutions at about two miles from the city, and they never came back. They were last heard of in General Hardee's camp, where they accidentally found their way, If any one wants to see Fremont mad, it is only necessary to mention body guard to his presence.
General Fremont. --We are not at all surprised to see the New York Herald opening in full cry after General Fremont. But yesterday, he was a demigod; to-day, an imbecile. Like these heathen is for the pleasure of bowling them down. "General Fremont," exclaims the Herald, "has been a scarcefallen our arms there." And this is the great Fremont, the "coming man," who, instead of "coming," Having never had much admiration of Monsieur Fremont, we are not at all surprised that while h had been as good a Union man as himself, Monsieur Fremont would not be in existence. To her secessseceders with a rope. We are now told that Col. Fremont intends to take the field in person, and, gel chieftain, General Price." We trust that Gen. Fremont will hasten to carry out that project, and ng else, can beat a retreat as effectually as Fremont himself. A few more proclamations from FremoFremont, threatening to hang seceders and emancipate slaves, a few more battles like Springfield and Lex
, Ill., Sept. 24. --Communication with Quency is still cut off, and nothing has been tread from Prentiss since yesterday. Washington, Sept. 24.--Opponents of Fremont charge that he could have prevented the necessity of Mulligan's surrender by sending timely reinforcements. Advices received from St. Louis by Fremont's friends,Fremont's friends, however, state that he had no troops to spare, and that it was entirely impossible for him strengthen Mulligan's position. Fremont telegraphed the War Department last night that he was on the eve of starting with a heavy force, and hoped he would be able to dislodge the rebels from their position at Lexington. St. Louis, SeFremont telegraphed the War Department last night that he was on the eve of starting with a heavy force, and hoped he would be able to dislodge the rebels from their position at Lexington. St. Louis, Sept. 23.--Prentiss's dispatch, announcing the surrender of Mulligan, states that the Federals lost 87 killed and 140 wounded. The rebel loss is supposed to be about 800 killed and wounded.