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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 462 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 416 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 286 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 260 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 254 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 242 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 230 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 218 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 166 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 3, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for New England (United States) or search for New England (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

ographical shape of their territory is itself sufficient to insure its separation; to say nothing of the stronger interests which would attract the Northwest to the South, and the certain loss of the Pacific slope to the Puritan Confederacy of New England and New York, with which it can have no congeniality. There is, moreover, as little sympathy between New England and the Middle States as between New York and Philadelphia, or as between Hartford and San Francisco. The separation of the SoutNew England and the Middle States as between New York and Philadelphia, or as between Hartford and San Francisco. The separation of the South will be the signal for the thorough disintegration of what will remain of the Union; for the part remaining will be the least homogeneous aggregation of communities on the face of the globe. The North still cling to the delusion that the South will ultimately come back and assent to reconstruction. In that delusion they are bent upon crushing out the sentiment at the South hostile to such an arrangement. They will not believe or realize the fact that public opinion here on that subject
The Daily Dispatch: October 3, 1861., [Electronic resource], Candidates for Congress in North Carolina. (search)
Expeditions for the Southern coast. There is no danger to be apprehended from the announcement at this time, (says the New York Commercial Advertiser,) that at least one expedition has sailed from Northern ports during the last few days, and is probably now on its way to the Southern coast. It is known that a number of steamers have lately left the port of New York, and that one or two regiments have mysteriously disappeared.--We learn that the true object of Gen. Batler's visit to New England was to superintend a similar embarkation, possibly from Boston, and which may also by this time be on the high seas to co-operate with that from this city. To what extent the squadron lying off Fortress Mouroc may take part in it, we are not prepared to say at present. It is sufficient to state that our public servants were never more actively engaged than they have been of late, and that Gen. Batler never acted more adroitly than on the occasion of his recent visit "to look after domes