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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 43 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 42 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 38 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 32 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 28 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 27 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 26 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 22 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 22 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 4, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for English or search for English in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: October 4, 1861., [Electronic resource], The European Journeys on American and Canadian affairs. (search)
ally put to rest by a letter from that Italian patriot to Mr. Frank Vizetelly, positively contradicting the rumor. He authorizes Mr. Vizetelly to say to those who assert that he will come over here — that "he will not come." Russian Versus English "sympathy." The New York Albion (English) remarks, on the recent correspondence between Gortschakoff and the Lincoln Government: We have endured for several months past — sometimes with patience, sometimes under indignant protest — allEnglish) remarks, on the recent correspondence between Gortschakoff and the Lincoln Government: We have endured for several months past — sometimes with patience, sometimes under indignant protest — all manner of abuse pelted at our Government and our nation, because both one and the other were said to lack sympathy with the United States. We have, moreover, been occasionally at a loss to comprehend how any official expression of sympathy could be reconciled with the policy of non-interference, to which we were warmly bidden to adhere. At length a new light breaks in upon us, Mr. Seward had the kindness a week ago, to explain to dull minded foreigners what would be acceptable at Washingt