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de Brig. Gen. Smith. Immediately following were Generals Johnston and Beauregard, and after them came Col. John S. Preston, Col. Thomas Preston, Col. Davis, Col. Randal, Prince Polignac, Capt. Ferguson, of Gen. Beauregard's staff, Capt. Peyton, Lt. Lane, son of Jo. Lane, of Oregon, Lt. Twiggs, and "Your Own. " Following was the Adam's Troop, dressed in a neat grey uniform, and presenting a truly imposing appearance. The ride through the country, although an interesting one, showed few inciJo. Lane, of Oregon, Lt. Twiggs, and "Your Own. " Following was the Adam's Troop, dressed in a neat grey uniform, and presenting a truly imposing appearance. The ride through the country, although an interesting one, showed few incidents that would bear recording. On every hand could be seen the regard and the respect the volunteers have for President Davis, and it was evident that the fact of his being in person on the field; his visiting the soldiers in their camps; his seeming solicitude for their comfort and safety, and the respectful manner in which he returned the salute of the humblest soldier, produced a deep impression upon those gallant men who have taken their lives in their hands and are enlisted in the defenc
on Tuesday noon.--He says that the main body of Price's force was at Lexington when he left, and that all the Federal officers had been released on parole except Mulligan, who refused to give for alleged private reasons. Price probably has a force of 35,000 men. He confidently expected the arrival of Hardee on Thursday, with eight thousand or nine thousand more. Ten thousand Southerners were sent across the Missouri from Lexington, on Thursday with the avowed intention of attacking Lane. The Lincolnites, at the time of their surrender, had no cartridges, grape, or other shot, and no shell, but lost two or three hundred kegs of powder. The Confederates are casting all kinds of balls. The Lexington foundry is running day and night. The Confederates are greatly encouraged and declare that St. Louis will shortly be in their possession. General Price's official report of the bank of Lexington has been received. The following is the closing paragraph: "
Supply train captured by the "Rebels." Leavenworth Sept. 28. --Reports from Lane's command indicate that after a successful engagement the "rebels" at Passinsville made a forced march on Occola, where they surprised and captured a large supply train.
The Daily Dispatch: October 4, 1861., [Electronic resource], The Religious exercises for the National Fast day. (search)
lition steamer Massachusetts, to proceed with his fleet to shell out the Island to-day! Thus the Captain has been saved all the fun and glory which he had expected to derive from such an exploit. Speculating in Kentucky. Several parties of gentlemen from Mississippi passed through this city yesterday on their way to Kentucky, which State now furnishes fine opportunities for speculating in a variety of ways. A large number of adventurers are now going in that direction by way of Knoxville and Nashville. Either mules or Yankees is understood to be their specialty. The Struggle in Kansas. The Liberty (Mo.) Tribune has a letter from Colonel John T. Hughes, of the Confederate Army, which is issued in an extra, reporting that a few days ago the Secession forces drove General Lane and his command into Kansas, with twelve killed, thirty or forty wounded, and thirty-five taken prisoners. He states that but two or three were killed and sixteen wounded on the Southern side.