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The Daily Dispatch: October 4, 1861., [Electronic resource], [Correspondence of the Richmond Daily Dispatch.] (search)
[Correspondence of the Richmond Daily Dispatch.] the feeling in the State--refugees — Federal Barbarism — a generous example, &c. Gallatin, Tennessee Sept. 26, 1861. We are in a high state of excitement here in consequence of Kentucky's folly, (neutrality,) whereby our and her troops have already met in battle; and because of the outrages perpetrated by Lincoln and his disciples on innocent men and women, even children, causing them to leave by hundreds in any sort of conveyance they may obtain. Many pass here every day. They represent portions of Kentucky whence they come in the same fix that poor Maryland is. We have more Kentuckians in our midst than I have ever seen here before. Some of them join our companies, and are anxious to meet even Kentuckians in the battle-field. You, perhaps, have no idea how desperately the Southern rights Kentuckians hate the Kentucky Lincolnites. I have it from a most reliable gentleman who had to leave because of his South
The Daily Dispatch: October 4, 1861., [Electronic resource], The Religious exercises for the National Fast day. (search)
cotton is about to be made from a Southern seaport to England. Is not this playing our best trump card into the hand of Lincoln, who will not wink at England getting her supply of cotton from us (apparently by stealth, but more probably by agreemened." If this is really the policy of the country, when and by whom was it settled? It is certainly the policy of Mr. Lincoln, but now is it our policy? He sees very clearly that unless we sell, we cannot buy. That, with an army of 200,000 or eir daily bread — bringing upon them the horrors of famine and revolution. Is this not true? Is not this the policy of Lincoln, and the legitimate tendency of that policy? Spain must be refused, too, though she generously protects our flag inme forty miles. Our Maryland friends need not be afraid hereafter, in crossing the river, of the Pawnee, or any other of Lincoln's ships. Unless there be an army of occupation all along the shore, there will be free communication between Maryland a
The Daily Dispatch: October 4, 1861., [Electronic resource], Colonel Reynold's report of the battle at Gauley river. (search)
Telegraph cable cut. --Day before yesterday the submerged telegraph cable of the Southern Line, stretching from Bay St. Louis to Pass Christian, was cut in two places by traitors, no doubt, in the pay of the enemy.--The cable, however, was repaired yesterday afternoon and the line put in working order. Our authorities cannot be two vigilant and active in their efforts to arrest such proceedings of Mr. Lincoln's hirelings who infest our coast.--N. O. Bulletin of Saturday.
The Daily Dispatch: October 4, 1861., [Electronic resource], The European Journeys on American and Canadian affairs. (search)
ements ordered to British North America, when added to the troops already there, will not cause the entire force to exceed the number usually kept in Canada in ordinary times. It commends the action of the Government as a prudent step. If President Lincoln asks what it means, he is to be answered civilly and politely; but that England is not bound to waste her breath in making any elaborate justification of a purely defensive act. The London Past, alluding to the appointment of Viscount Mtraveler would find himself more at liberty in Venice than in New York." We are told that these things jar strangely with-English ideas of America and its institutions, but that war has brought a host of exigencies in its train, and that Mr. Lincoln "could do no loss." When the war is over, it says: "The two great divisions of the States formerly united will form, we hope, two prosperous communities; but we do not expect that either of them will bear much resemblance to the lost American
Foreign officers. --The Lincolnite journals boast of the great number of foreign officers in their service. If they had the smallest modicum of national, or even sectional, pride or self-respect, they would refrain from glorying in what, properly considered, is their shame.--It speaks poorly for their vaunted military superiority over the South that they must scour the whole earth not only for materials to fill their ranks, but officers to lead their armies.--The South has no more reason to fear the imported than the native officers of the Lincoln army. They are in general mere military adventurers, Dugald Dalgetty's, who can never stand against the cause and the men of the Southern Republic. No respectable European officer, who has been successful and is considered a valuable man at home, is going to embark his fortunes in such a crazy vessel as "The Grand Army."
What Lincoln is doing in Northwestern Virginia. --It seems to be clear that the Lincoln Government has organized a new United States District Court in Northwestern Virginia appointing some traitor in place of -dge Brockenbrough, and that this Court instructed its grand jury to indict, and they have accordingly indicted, several hundred worthy citizens of that region for treason. Among those thus branded as traitors by the abominable Lincoln dynasty, we may mention the venerable Gen. T. Lincoln dynasty, we may mention the venerable Gen. T. S. Haymond, of Marton county, who is now in this city, and a number of other refugees from that section. Col. W. J. Willey is also under the ban. So, also, are many worthy and loyal Virginians whose circumstances would not allow them to leave home. These cases call with a loud call upon the Confederate Government to council in its power to extend its authority under that portion of our State. Let Rosenalez Reynolds, and their followers, aiders, and abettors, be expelled by a powerful army, a
The Southern-bound Lincoln fleet. Augusta, Ga., Sept. 25. --The Savannah Republican of this morning says that the accounts from Richmond relative to the destination of the fleet recently fitted out by Lincoln, has been corroborated by a letter from a Southern lady in New York. It has also been corroborated by intelligence received in Charleston. On Monday last, Gen. Ripley received a dispatch, announcing that the fleet recently fitting out at Old Point Comfort had sailed South. The Southern-bound Lincoln fleet. Augusta, Ga., Sept. 25. --The Savannah Republican of this morning says that the accounts from Richmond relative to the destination of the fleet recently fitted out by Lincoln, has been corroborated by a letter from a Southern lady in New York. It has also been corroborated by intelligence received in Charleston. On Monday last, Gen. Ripley received a dispatch, announcing that the fleet recently fitting out at Old Point Comfort had sailed South.
or words with any man guilty of so contemptible an action, either in one or the other. If we have no faith in our Government, now that we have marched so far upon the road to independence under its skillful guidance, when, in the name of common sense, shall confidence be established? Does the action of such miserable wretches who refuse our Treasury notes, or who desive to have them discounted, arise from purely mercenary motives, or from fear that they will never be paid? If the former, their souls are so small that a million might dance upon a mustard seed, and cannot, at heart, be true friends to the South; if the latter, we advise that they be immediately ordered to leave for a more genial climate, where their patriotism will be better appreciated — under the Government of Abe Lincoln. Every man who refuses to receive Treasury notes in payment of all just dues, or even in ordinary business transactions at par, is no friend to the South, and should be dealt with accordingly.