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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 692 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 516 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 418 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War 358 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 298 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 230 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 190 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 186 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 182 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 4, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for France (France) or search for France (France) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Deaths from diseases in war. --An intelligent British writer, referring to the fact that in all armies more men perish from disease than war, observes that what was so power fully said in the last century has remained in a great degree true in our own: "The life of a modern soldier is ill-represented by heroic fiction. War has means of destruction more formidable than the cannon and the sword. Of the thousands and ten thousands that perished in our late contests with France and Spain, a very small part ever felt the stroke of an enemy; the rest languished in tents and ships, amidst damps and putrefaction; pale, torpid, spiritless, and helpless; gasping and groaning, unpitied among men, made obdurate by long continuance of hopeless misery; and were at last whelmed in pits or heaved into the ocean, without notice or remembrance. By incommodious encampments and unwholesome stations, where courage is declass and enterprise impracticable, fleets are silently dispeopled, and a
The Daily Dispatch: October 4, 1861., [Electronic resource], The Religious exercises for the National Fast day. (search)
es very clearly that unless we sell, we cannot buy. That, with an army of 200,000 or 200,000 men in the field requiring arms, Comminution, blankets, clothing, and a thousand other necessaries, it would be far more easy to conquer us by stopping these supplies, than by meeting our brave defenders in fair fight and on equal terms. Hence he adopts the most effectual means of stopping our imports; he arrests our exports as well. At an enormous expense, and at the risk of a war with England and France, he refuses to allow these countries to have a bale of our Southern cotton. We have told these Governments that this is an act of hostility to them; that it is ruinous to their manufacture and trade; that it endangers even their security, by depriving millions of their subjects of the employment upon which they depend for their daily bread — bringing upon them the horrors of famine and revolution. Is this not true? Is not this the policy of Lincoln, and the legitimate tendency of that pol
not look upon them. The article is an unusually able one, and will be read with no ordinary interest: The American revolution. Were England at this moment to announce to the world its intention to make the speediest possible conquest of France, or were France to make the same declaration as to England, the world would laugh at the egregious folly that had inspired the design and prompted the boast. The world would grant that, supposing either people to be infatuated enough, and obstinFrance to make the same declaration as to England, the world would laugh at the egregious folly that had inspired the design and prompted the boast. The world would grant that, supposing either people to be infatuated enough, and obstinate enough, it could inflict enormous and irreparable injuries on the other, but only at the cost of equal injuries to itself. The ball once started, Fortune might befriend this side or that; it might give to either great victories or periods of advantage; it might even place one eventually over the head of the other; but still only at a cost utterly out of proportion to the value of the miserable result. Now, that is the case of the two Confederacies across the Atlantic, where the surviving h