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The Daily Dispatch: October 10, 1861., [Electronic resource], The Cherokee Nation Passes an Ordinance of Secession. (search)
sion pressure. On August 20th, he called his counsel together at Talequah, and sent a message recommending the severance of their connection with the United States, and an alliance with the Southern Confederacy. The Council approved of the recommendation, and appointed Commissioners to make a treaty of alliance with the Southern Confederacy. The Confederate Commissioners assumed the payment of the annuities heretofore received by the Cherokees from our Government. The Creek Indians have raised 10,000 men for service in the Confederate army, and the Cherokees have formed a home guard, 1,200 strong. It appears that the troops sent into Arkansas by Ben. McCulloch, after the battle of Springfield, were posted on the border of the Cherokee Nation to intimidate the Council and force John Ross to yield to the demands of the rebels. Colonel St. George Cooke. of the Utah, forces, arrived to-day. His regulars, 600 in number, will reach Leavenworth in three or four days.
The Daily Dispatch: October 10, 1861., [Electronic resource], The Cherokee Nation Passes an Ordinance of Secession. (search)
The war in Missouri. --A telegraphic dispatch from Jefferson City, Mo., Sept. 30, says: Gen. McKinstry and staff arrived here last evening. Gen. Pope is still here. Totten's battery was among the arrivals yesterday. Scouts arrived last night from Warsaw, 88 miles distant, but they report nothing new. They heard that McCulloch was advancing on Jefferson City by way of Linn creek. Two Federal officers from Lexington declare that the rebels fight well, and our mistake has been that we always underrate them. The force at Lexington are receiving provisions in quantities from the adjacent country. Wagon loads arriving every day, and they have, it is said, every means of support. Green's Raines's, and Parsons's troops are represented as a mere mob, half clothed and without discipline, no one seeming to hold a less rank than that of Colonel. Harris's soldiers, 7,000 in number, are very well disciplined, and execute all their manœuveres in thorough military styl