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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,286 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 656 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 566 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 416 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 360 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 298 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 298 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 272 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 24, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) or search for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 5 document sections:

Mr. George A. Trenholm, of Charleston, S. C., recently contributed one hundred dollars to the South Carolina Hospital, and has pledged the same amount monthly for the same object for twelve months.
e then first apprised, and were made sensible of the claims of gratitude which your generous provision and care for so many sick and suffering volunteers from South Carolina had laid upon the citizens of that State. A committee charged with the subject waited upon Gov. Pickens. He desired that a committee of the Association, visit for the establishment and support of army hospitals for the South Carolina Volunteers in every field of service. I would do injustice to the people of South Carolina if I did not take this occasion to express their profound admiration and gratitude for the generous profusion of the citizens of Virginia in providing for themilies in Richmond, and every where else within reach of the encampments. The memory of all that you have done will long abide in the hearts of the people of South Carolina, and bind them to the citizens of Virginia by the strongest ties of esteem and gratitude, I am, with great respect,Your obedient servant. Edward frost, Cha
Promotions. Brigadier Gen'l E. Kirby Smith, of Florida, has been promoted to the rank of Major-General in the Confederate army. Col. Geo. B. Evans, of South Carolina, who commanded the forces at Leesburg, was recently promoted to the rank of Brigadier-General.
The naval victory at Southwest pass--Lieut. Warley. A gentleman in New Orleans, writing to a friend in this city, speaks as follows of this engagement, and of the officer who may be fairly considered the hero of it: "No doubt before this you have seen in the papers full accounts of the affair of the 12th. It was a very bold and well-executed enter-prise, and the "hero" of the party is Lieut. Warley, of South Carolina. He commanded the steam ram (which the people of New Orleans have christened 'Manassas' or 'Bull Run') that ran into the Richmond at four A. M. This, with the four ships, constituted such a novel style of warfare, and spread such consternation among the enemy, that all their ships, four or five in number, slipped their cables and fled down the river. The suspense of those on board the other vessels for the fate of their brave companions was for some time very painful; but when daylight came, and they saw that the enemy had fled, their joy was complete. The
ah Republican: My Dear Sir --I enclose to you a piece of calf-skin tanned by me with a weed called the Dog Fennel, for which I have obtained a patent (No. 22) from the Confederate States Government. I claim that I can tan and make better leather, in one-third less time, with one-third the bark, and save from 30 to 40 per cent. This piece was tanned in 20 days, and I think it as good as French calf. I am prepared to dispose of Rights in all the Confederate States of America, except South Carolina, which I have disposed of. Very respectfully, yours, Isaac Bierfield. The editor of the Republican remarks upon the above-- "The sample of calf skin referred to above has come to hand, and we shall take pleasure in exhibiting it to all who feel an interest in the leather trade. We have never seen a prettier article, and in point of strength it is remarkable. It is almost incredible that such leather should be tanned in the short space of twenty days; and the wonder i