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ed by him in fact, and in conformity with his orders our military movements are strictly regulated.--So that, whether it was good policy to enter Maryland or not, it is the President, and not the Generals, upon whom the responsibility of action or non-action rests. We don't believe that any service in the world has more accomplished military men than are at the head of the Southern armies. Gen. A. Johnston, of Kentucky, Gen. Johnston, Commander in Chief of the Army of the Potomac, Gen. Beauregard, Gen. Smith, Gen. Lee, Gen. Magruder, --we know not where to stop,--form a host of military worthies that would adorn any service in any age. We conceive that they have every motive to accomplish everything within their power which can operate upon the most unsparing of their critics, and probably understand their business as well. And this is equally true of the President. Undoubtedly, if any one individual in this Government has more interest than any other in the success of our arm
The Daily Dispatch: October 25, 1861., [Electronic resource], The Northern Programme for coast invasion. (search)
The Race, at Fairfield, to-day, between Beauregard, Ninette, and a favorite son of Di Clapperton and Revenue, promises to be one of the most spirited and well- contested that has been witnessed on that time-honored course for many years. Ninette has once conquered both the colts on former occasions, and Beauregard, in turn, has sanded her face and snatched the coveted prize from her grasp.--Who knows but it may now be time for the son of Di to show them both his heels, and thus make it nconquered both the colts on former occasions, and Beauregard, in turn, has sanded her face and snatched the coveted prize from her grasp.--Who knows but it may now be time for the son of Di to show them both his heels, and thus make it necessary for them to meet again and fight their battles o'er. Our choice for the day would be the filly, because of her speed and endurance; but it not up to the mark, she may fall into second place. Let all who admire the sport be on hand to enjoy it to-day.
The State of the Odds. --In the pools last night Beauregard had the call in the race of to day, but by a very small fraction. It stood, generally, Beauregard 45, Ninette 45, McDaniels colt 10. The State of the Odds. --In the pools last night Beauregard had the call in the race of to day, but by a very small fraction. It stood, generally, Beauregard 45, Ninette 45, McDaniels colt 10.
The Daily Dispatch: October 25, 1861., [Electronic resource], Wealth, pauperism, and crime in the North (search)
Yesterday, thorough scouting in front of our lines over the river developed the fact that Beauregard has withdrawn all his camps as far back as Fairfax Court-House, which is now his extreme front the advance of a more considerable force. The facts of these changes of the positions of Beauregard's force lately camped nearest our lines confirms the impression that the main body of the enemion of Leesburg by the enemy. Some days since we took occasion to explain that such a step on Beauregard and Johnston's part would sooner or later become a military necessity, in view of Gen. McClellul. The New York Times and Tribune are trying to persuade themselves that the main body of Beauregard's army has already retired back of Manassas, and is now engaged in fortifying the line of the s again. Scouting between Fairfax Court-House and Vienna yesterday disclosed the fact that Beauregard has again broken up the roads between those points, as before McDowell's advance to Bull Run.
say that an attempt to effect a landing will very soon be made. Thanks to the energy of General Ripley, it is not likely that we shall have the mortification of chronicling any "Hatteras Affair" on the coast of this State. A present to Gen. Beauregard. "Personnel," the Charleston Courier's correspondent, writing from Fairfax Court-House, Va., on the 5th inst., says: I learn that Gen. Beauregard has lately received a present from a young lady in Alexandria--one of those quaint yeGen. Beauregard has lately received a present from a young lady in Alexandria--one of those quaint yet delicate tokens which could have been conceived no where but in a woman's brain. It was simply three elegant shirt studs, with the words, "Let — us — out" respectfully enameled on each. I have not heard that the gallant General yet wears the expressive appeal over his heart, but I think it is in his heart, nevertheless. Gen. Bragg among the wounded soldiers. The Observer has the following allusion to Gen. Bragg's visit to the Pensacola hospitals, on the 12th: This distinguis