hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 36 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 36 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Short studies of American authors 17 1 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 17 3 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907 14 0 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 13 5 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country 12 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 26, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Emerson or search for Emerson in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 1 document section:

The Daily Dispatch: October 26, 1861., [Electronic resource], Protestant Episcopal Convention in the Confederate States--Final action upon changing its name. (search)
inning of divisions, and lead to disintegration to a greater or less extent. Bishop Atkinson considered the choice to be between Protestant and Reformed. Reformed expressed a fact, Protestant a spirit, and one that he could not approve of. Emerson, Beecher, Parker, Strauss, etc., were all Protestants, yet Emerson believed the leaves of the forest were God. The term, besides denoting unrest, doubt, denial and unbelief, was indefinite, and inexpressive of anything good. He like the word CEmerson believed the leaves of the forest were God. The term, besides denoting unrest, doubt, denial and unbelief, was indefinite, and inexpressive of anything good. He like the word Catholic, because it indicates the continuity of the Church of Christ. The state of religious feeling in Geneva, Holland, and elsewhere in Europe, among the sects called Protestant, was not such as to recommend the name, except where the influence of the English Church was felt, and produced a better sentiment. Bishop Gregg agreed with the Bishop of North Carolina entirely as to the facts, but thought it wholly inexpedient to make any change. The question for them to determine was, what i