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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 172 16 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 152 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 120 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 113 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 107 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 106 6 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 106 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 102 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 89 15 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 68 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 31, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Fremont or search for Fremont in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: October 31, 1861., [Electronic resource], The blockading fleet off New Orleans — News direct from the enemy. (search)
dvices which announce that Gen. Price was at Neosho on the 18th inst. His army was in good fighting condition, and Gen. McCulloch was in close proximity, and daily receiving large accessions. Their combined forces will outnumber any force that Fremont can bring against them. The opinion prevailed, that Gen. Fremont was making a desperate effort to retrieve his failing fortunes. Gen. Price's retrograde movement was strategical and his troops are now amply supplied with ammunition, and de any force that Fremont can bring against them. The opinion prevailed, that Gen. Fremont was making a desperate effort to retrieve his failing fortunes. Gen. Price's retrograde movement was strategical and his troops are now amply supplied with ammunition, and determined to stand. Jeff. Thompson is in Memphis. He left his command safe. It was reported, at St. Louis, that 300 rebels had congregated at Fulton, with the design of crossing the river, and burning the Orange bridge.
Price was retreating towards Greenfield, in Dade county. Gen. Siegel's advance guard was near Bolivar on Tuesday evening, and his main body at Quincy. General Seigel was as far South as General Price's rebel army, but some twenty-five miles east of him, and evidently aiming for Springfield, to cut off his retreat South, while General Lane was only two day's march north of him. Gen, Lane's forces were at Osceola, and Gen. S gis's entire command was but one day's march behind. Fremont is at Pommedette River, en route for Quincey. Gen. Pope was marching on Leesville, via Sedalia. A detachment of U. S. cavalry broke up a rebel camp at Buffalo Mills on Tuesday night, killing seventeen and wounding a large number, also taking ninety prisoners and a large number of horses. Capture by a privateer — the Brig Granada taken by the Sallie. From the New York Post, of the 24th of October, we take the following: The brig Granada, Captain Pettingill, from Nuev
Gen, Fremont and the Administration. Washington, Oct. 25.--Gen. Fremont gives the Administration much trouble. The Cabinet had a meeting on the 23d inst., and some favored depriving him of his command immediately, and ordering him to Washington, to be tried by a court-martial. The matter was left with the President to decide, who finds it a very difficult question to settle, as it involves not only great pecuniary interests to the Government, but perhaps immediate and important militarymont and the Administration. Washington, Oct. 25.--Gen. Fremont gives the Administration much trouble. The Cabinet had a meeting on the 23d inst., and some favored depriving him of his command immediately, and ordering him to Washington, to be tried by a court-martial. The matter was left with the President to decide, who finds it a very difficult question to settle, as it involves not only great pecuniary interests to the Government, but perhaps immediate and important military results.