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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 836 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 690 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 532 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 480 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 406 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 350 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 332 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 322 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 310 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 294 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 31, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Missouri (Missouri, United States) or search for Missouri (Missouri, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

New map. --A map of the Seat of War in the West has just made its appearance in this city, which seems to have been gotten up with pains, and is executed with much taste and beauty. It embraces the Valley of the Mississippi below the mouth of the Missouri, including the States of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Arkansas, with a portion of Texas, of the Indian Territory, and of Kansas, together with West Tennessee, West Kentucky, South Illinois, and Indiana, and South Missouri. It is a colored lithograph, and seems to present an accurate view of the whole region embraced, its chief towns, rivers, roads, general topography, and political lines. It is certainly the beat map yet extant of the Mississippi Valley. It is for sale by J. W. dolph, 121 Main street.
mitted to approach or hold communication with any of the Federal vessels anchored in the stream. Gen. Wool has notified the rebels repeatedly that all communication by flags of truce will be discontinued until the fleet has sailed. From Missouri. The following Northern dispatches in regard to the progress of the war in Missouri are too palpably false to justify us in reminding our readers that due caution should be observed in placing a proper estimate upon newspaper reports from thMissouri are too palpably false to justify us in reminding our readers that due caution should be observed in placing a proper estimate upon newspaper reports from that side of the Potomac: St. Louis, Oct. 25.--A Jefferson City dispatch to the Democrat reports, that it was rumored at Tipton, and believed, that Lane and Montgomery have intercepted McCulloch's rebel force, and cut his whole army to pieces. St. Louis, Oct. 24.--Col. Morgan, with 220 men of the 18th Missouri regiment, and two pieces of artillery, had a fight with some 400 rebels, on Big Hurricane Creek, Carrol county, last Saturday, killing 14, taking eight prisoners, and putting the
The Daily Dispatch: October 31, 1861., [Electronic resource], The blockading fleet off New Orleans — News direct from the enemy. (search)
Latest from Missouri. Memphis, Oct. 29.--The Appeal, of this city, has reliable advices which announce that Gen. Price was at Neosho on the 18th inst. His army was in good fighting condition, and Gen. McCulloch was in close proximity, and daily receiving large accessions. Their combined forces will outnumber any force that Fremont can bring against them. The opinion prevailed, that Gen. Fremont was making a desperate effort to retrieve his failing fortunes. Gen. Price's retrograde movement was strategical and his troops are now amply supplied with ammunition, and determined to stand. Jeff. Thompson is in Memphis. He left his command safe. It was reported, at St. Louis, that 300 rebels had congregated at Fulton, with the design of crossing the river, and burning the Orange bridge.