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William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 1,765 1 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 1,301 9 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 947 3 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 914 0 Browse Search
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House 776 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 495 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 485 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 456 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 410 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 405 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 6, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Abraham Lincoln or search for Abraham Lincoln in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 6 document sections:

Resignation of Gen. Scott. We publish this morning a full confirmation of the report of Gen. Scott's retirement from active service, with the superannuated traitor's letter and address on the occasion, and President Lincoln's reply. The reason alleged for this step is increasing infirmity, and a thoroughly diseased carcase, which, even in its last throes, emits and odor of hatred and vituperation against its native South. Yet he does not give up his hold upon the Federal Treasury, and doubtless the whole plan was pre-arranged. His pay goes on, as a condition of getting him out of the way; and, we infer, the Federal Administration was glad enough to be rid of him on these terms. It is said that Scott will pass the brief remainder of his existence in Europe which we deem a prudent course on his part, for he will thus place himself beyond the reach of those towards whom he has, in his declining days, shown such base ingratitude. Gen. McClellan takes Gen. Scott's position,
Gen. Scott's letter of Resignation--Gen. McClellan to take Gen. Scott's place — letters from Lincoln and Cammeron, etc. The New York Times, of Saturday last, furnishes us with the following tion to the Secretary of War, &c. The following letter from Gen. Scott was received by President Lincoln on Thursday afternoon, the 31st ult.: Headquarters of the army. Washington, Oct. 31,ce of General Scott. Being seated, the President read to the General the following order: Lincoln's letter — sympathy for Scott's condition. On the 1st day of November, A. D. 1861, upon histhe Constitution, the Union, and the flag, when assailed by parricidal rebellion. [Signed] Abraham Lincoln. Gen. Scott Addresses the President and Cabinet — is Overcome with emotion — he believr it with confidence in its success over all its enemies, and that speedily." Speech from Lincoln. The President then took leave of General Scott, giving him his hand, and saying he hoped
A Federal View of the War in Kentucky. advance of Gen. Rousseau--incidents of the march--Hon. Humphrey Marshalls' Escapes — some Peculiarities of the War, &c. The New York Times, a blatant champion for Lincoln and his unconstitutional acts, publishes the following letter from its correspondent in Kentucky. Though glossed over to suit the Federal side of the question, yet the account will afford some interest to the Southern reader: Camp at Nolin Creek, Ky., Oct. 23, 1861. Last Saturday afternoon, Brig. Gen. Rousseau, at the head of the Louisville Legion and the First Kentucky Cavalry, took up the line of march towards the enemy's lines. --Nothing could exceed the enthusiasm and spirit of the men as they marched out of camp with bands discoursing and banners flying, and filed beneath the overhanging maples and across the long, narrow old bridge that spans Nolin Creek, and past the clattering old, red, moss- grown mill, which in all its quiet, gray old life, n
subjugation. Have they failed in that? They undertook to hold and maintain a line of defence which would render the capital of Virginia secure. Have they failed in that? They undertook to hold the important key of Manassas, and has that been wrested from their hands? They never did undertake to capture the city of Washington, or to do more than compel the enemy to "let us alone," to prevent them from striking a fatal blow at our independence, and from bringing us under the dominion of Lincoln. Have they failed in that? A failure! Was Bethel a failure? Was Bull Run a failure? Was the battle of Manassas a failure? Were Carnifax Ferry and Greenbrier River failures? Was Leesburg a failure? Is the possession of Norfolk and its immense Navy-Yard a failure? Look back at the hour when the Pawnee was expected to come up the James River, and could have come up without passing one fortification; when the York River had not a gun upon it: when five hundred men was the extent of our
Lincoln's Cabinet. The latest accounts from the North fall to confirm the rumor of an explosion in Lincoln's Cabinet, and the consequent withdrawed of three of its members. The only fact in the entire report, so far as we can learn, is that the distinguished Lieutenant General has been placed on the retired list at his own request. Lincoln's Cabinet. The latest accounts from the North fall to confirm the rumor of an explosion in Lincoln's Cabinet, and the consequent withdrawed of three of its members. The only fact in the entire report, so far as we can learn, is that the distinguished Lieutenant General has been placed on the retired list at his own request.
The Daily Dispatch: November 6, 1861., [Electronic resource], The Departure of Messrs. Mason the Slidell — their arrival in Havana — how they reached Cuba, etc. (search)
Fremont and the War. We continue to receive reports from Washington that Fremont is organizing a rebellion in the West against Lincoln, but have nothing confirmatory of such a movement. We have no doubt of his disposition to look out for Number One, and if his aspirations are checked by the managers at Washington, there may yet he trouble in the camp.