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of magnanimity has prevented them from extinguishing the Generals aforesaid, by proceeding to the seat of war and taking command of the army themselves. It is believed, however, that unless Johnston, Beauregard & Co., do better, and make their winter quarters in the North Pole, these warlike lights, which are at present under a bushel, will transfer themselves at once to Manassas. They will not have the slightest hesitation in doing so, in the event that Prince Sa-am Sa-am supersedes General McClellan. Probably the Prince Sa-am Sa-am has no equal this side of Hindustan except these masked batteries in private life, who are waiting for him to come over. We therefore advise, invoke, and exhort, the said Johnston, Beauregard and Magruder, to disperse the enemy forthwith, or else disperse to their own respective places of abode. If they do not capture Washington forthwith, and annex Pennsylvania and New York to the Southern Confederacy before Christmas, let them give place to those w
firmation of the report of Gen. Scott's retirement from active service, with the superannuated traitor's letter and address on the occasion, and President Lincoln's reply. The reason alleged for this step is increasing infirmity, and a thoroughly diseased carcase, which, even in its last throes, emits and odor of hatred and vituperation against its native South. Yet he does not give up his hold upon the Federal Treasury, and doubtless the whole plan was pre-arranged. His pay goes on, as a condition of getting him out of the way; and, we infer, the Federal Administration was glad enough to be rid of him on these terms. It is said that Scott will pass the brief remainder of his existence in Europe which we deem a prudent course on his part, for he will thus place himself beyond the reach of those towards whom he has, in his declining days, shown such base ingratitude. Gen. McClellan takes Gen. Scott's position, and has not therefore, resigned, as rumored for a day or two past.
The Daily Dispatch: November 6, 1861., [Electronic resource], A frightful stampede of cavalry horses. (search)
Gen. McClellan's Successor. Our dispatches, through Louisville, Ky., announce that Gen. McClellan has been superceded in his position in the Federal army by Gen. Henry W. Halleck. Gen. H. has long held a prominent position, and we understand graduated at West Point in 1839, with the third honor of his class. He was subsequeGen. McClellan has been superceded in his position in the Federal army by Gen. Henry W. Halleck. Gen. H. has long held a prominent position, and we understand graduated at West Point in 1839, with the third honor of his class. He was subsequently promoted in the army, and figured conspicuously in California during the trying times of the early emigration and organization of that region into a State of the old Union. He is an author of some repute as well as a military gentleman of prominence. Whether he will "follow in the footsteps of his illustrious predecessor," tion and organization of that region into a State of the old Union. He is an author of some repute as well as a military gentleman of prominence. Whether he will "follow in the footsteps of his illustrious predecessor," General McClellan, and refuse to rush on the Confederates forces at Centreville and Manassas, time will tell.
Latest from the North.highly important News. Gen. Scott's letter of Resignation--Gen. McClellan to take Gen. Scott's place — letters from Lincoln and Cammeron, etc. The New York Times, of Saturday last, furnishes us with the following interesting news from the Federal metropolis: Retirement of Gen. Scott. His letter of Resignation to the Secretary of War, &c. The following letter from Gen. Scott was received by President Lincoln on Thursday afternoon, the 31st ult.: A special Cabinet council was convened on Friday morning, at 9 o'clock, to take the subject into consideration. It was decided that Gen. Scott's request, under the circumstances of his advanced age and infirmities, could not be declined. General McClellan was therefore, with the unanimous agreement of the Cabinet, notified that the command of the Army would be devolved upon him. At four o'clock in the afternoon, the Cabinet again waited upon the President, and attended him to the residence o
From Washington. English Government agents along the Southern coast — Resignation of Scott.-- Gen. McClellan superseded. Washington, Nov. 1. --The Federal Government has information that the English Government has agents all along the Southern coast, buying all ship timber, and measures have been taken to put a stop to it immediately. Nashville, Nov. 4.--A special dispatch to the Union and American, from Bowling Green to-night, states that the Louisville Journal. of thetaken to put a stop to it immediately. Nashville, Nov. 4.--A special dispatch to the Union and American, from Bowling Green to-night, states that the Louisville Journal. of the 1st inst., had been received, which contained dispatches from Washington, which announced that Gen. Scott had resigned, and that his chief clerk had fled from Washington, taking with him all the coast surveys and other important papers. The dispatch also states that Gen. Halleck had superseded Gen. McClellan.