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The Daily Dispatch: November 6, 1861., [Electronic resource], Arms of precision in Inexperienced hand. (search)
hird, and was used by him in the great fight, where he cried--'A horse, a horse; a kingdom for a horse.' The next time we hear of it, it had fallen into the hands of the family of Cornwallis, and when his lordship of revolution times was about to leave England for this country, it was presented to him with great ceremony, and brought over in two ships. After the battle of Yorktown it was surrendered to General Washington, on the 19th day of Oct., 1781. From thence it got into the hands of Gen. Scott, (not the one he left in a drinking-house in Richmond,) and was worn by him at Manassas, and left in his carriage just before the great Bull Run races began. --From a gentleman who now lives near Yorktown, the company, as before said, purchased it at great cost. You perceive, sir, from the scars and other evidences of age and hard usage, that it has done serious work in its time, and I trust, sir, that with a strong arm and valiant heart, you will with it hew your enemies and the enemies
Resignation of Gen. Scott. We publish this morning a full confirmation of the report of Gen. Scott's retirement from active service, with the superannuated traitor's letter and address on the occasion, and President Lincoln's reply. The reasonGen. Scott's retirement from active service, with the superannuated traitor's letter and address on the occasion, and President Lincoln's reply. The reason alleged for this step is increasing infirmity, and a thoroughly diseased carcase, which, even in its last throes, emits and odor of hatred and vituperation against its native South. Yet he does not give up his hold upon the Federal Treasury, and dot of the way; and, we infer, the Federal Administration was glad enough to be rid of him on these terms. It is said that Scott will pass the brief remainder of his existence in Europe which we deem a prudent course on his part, for he will thus plat, for he will thus place himself beyond the reach of those towards whom he has, in his declining days, shown such base ingratitude. Gen. McClellan takes Gen. Scott's position, and has not therefore, resigned, as rumored for a day or two past.
etter of Resignation--Gen. McClellan to take Gen. Scott's place — letters from Lincoln and Cammeron,m the Federal metropolis: Retirement of Gen. Scott. His letter of Resignation to the Secret with high respect,Your obedient servant, Winfield Scott. A special Cabinet meeting.--M' Cleect into consideration. It was decided that Gen. Scott's request, under the circumstances of his addent, and attended him to the residence of General Scott. Being seated, the President read to the ng order: Lincoln's letter — sympathy for Scott's condition. On the 1st day of November, Acoln. The President then took leave of General Scott, giving him his hand, and saying he hoped haking of hands — the Secretaries to accompany Scott to New York. Each member of the Administrareasury, and the Secretary of War, accompany Gen. Scott to New York to-morrow by the early train. nse of the Secretary of War to the letter of Gen. Scott: War Department, Washington, November [5 more...
From Washington. English Government agents along the Southern coast — Resignation of Scott.-- Gen. McClellan superseded. Washington, Nov. 1. --The Federal Government has information that the English Government has agents all along the Southern coast, buying all ship timber, and measures have been taken to put a stop to it immediately. Nashville, Nov. 4.--A special dispatch to the Union and American, from Bowling Green to-night, states that the Louisville Journal. of thtaken to put a stop to it immediately. Nashville, Nov. 4.--A special dispatch to the Union and American, from Bowling Green to-night, states that the Louisville Journal. of the 1st inst., had been received, which contained dispatches from Washington, which announced that Gen. Scott had resigned, and that his chief clerk had fled from Washington, taking with him all the coast surveys and other important papers. The dispatch also states that Gen. Halleck had superseded Gen. McClellan.