Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 20, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Abe Lincoln or search for Abe Lincoln in all documents.

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s — anecdote of Gen. Bragg. [Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] "Live Oak Camp." Near Pensacola, Fla., Nov. 11, 1861. The welcome face of your valuable paper occasionally greets my vision, and from which I glean much of interest; and although your columns appear to be constantly full yet a few items from this out-of-the-way place may not be without general interest to your many readers. Though at the present time quiet, there is no telling how soon a detachment from Lincoln's armada may feel in a mood to test the strength of some of our batteries, and send us a bomb by way of salute, on which occasion they may rest assured we shall not turn on them the cold shoulder. Since our attack on Wilson's camp, the morning of the 9th October, the entire force on the island have been very industrious. Billy's "pets" have had a new and complete fit-out, many wooden buildings have been erected, and they have quite a town there. They have put all their "barbette" gun
merica was striving for empire, and the other for independence or power Mr. Fay protests in the strongest terms against Lord Russell's reasonings, and complains in general terms against the sympathy accorded to the rebels by the English and continental journals. The London Times editorially criticises Mr. Fay's letter, and says that although it carries American prolixity to the farthest point, it is not to be compared to the absurd and peevish utterances of Cassius M. Clay and other of Lincoln's diplomatists. The London Times, after arguing the question of slavery in its relation to the existing contest, asserts that the recognition of the Confederate States and peaceable separation will accomplish everything which the Northern anti-slavery party has been advocating for years. The London Times says: "For our own part, we, as Englishmen, shall be glad to see the establishment of the Confederate States, simply because the political power of the slave-owners will be
prove true, it will be a source of great affliction to the relatives and friends of Mr. Ficklin. He was an energetic, persevering, far-seeing, and industrious man, and deserves a better fate and higher reward than the dungeon of some castle in Lincoln's dominions. Mr. Chiles N. Brand, one of our old citizens, died last week. He was an honest and good man, a firm and decided tee-to taler, and known everywhere as the wheel-horse of the temperance cause. Among others at his funeral I saw ew months past, when he resigned, is now the pastor of the Presbyterian Church in this place, and is destined to accomplish much good as a minister of Jesus Christ. It is also reported that the Baptists are endeavoring to get the Rev. Mr. Brantley, of South Carolina, as their pastor. This clergyman has for the past several years settled in Philadelphia, but the war which Abe Lincoln is waging against the South caused him to resign and return home to the land of his birth. Monticello.
The Daily Dispatch: November 20, 1861., [Electronic resource], The salt speculators of Lynchburg, Va. (search)
Mexico Appealing to Lincoln's Government to sustain her against England and France, &c. New York, Nov. 11. --The Herald's special Washington dispatch says that a gentleman occupying a high position in Mexico had just arrived in Washington and reported to President Lincoln that the whole West coast of Mexico and Sonora was greatly excited in view of the contemplated intervention of England, France, and Spain, with their affairs.--They desired to know from the United States Government wPresident Lincoln that the whole West coast of Mexico and Sonora was greatly excited in view of the contemplated intervention of England, France, and Spain, with their affairs.--They desired to know from the United States Government whether they would sustain them against the intrigues of Spain. A special dispatch to the Tribune, dated Washington Nov. 11th, says that a gentleman, in citizen's dress, and with a pass from Gen. McClellan's headquarters, visited on Saturday all the posts in the left wing of the Federal army, and was recognized on his return to Alexandria as an officer in the rebel army.