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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 46 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 40 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 26, 1861., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 4 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 25, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 26, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Henry Laurens or search for Henry Laurens in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 1 document section:

ase (not) parallel. --Ion, the correspondent of the Baltimore Sun, brings up the case of Henry Laurens, of South Carolina, who was captured in 1779 by a British frigate, while proceeding to Holland on a mission from the Congress. The cases are not parallel. Laurens was captured in an American ship, the ship itself being therefore an enemy's ship, and persons on board of it standing in exacners were put in the British mail-bag before the capture, and have thus gone safe to Europe. Mr. Laurens was less fortunate.--He had prepared his papers with lead in such a manner that he thought th if there had not been war with the Dutch, and there would have been no war with the Dutch if Mr. Laurens had succeeded in sinking his dispatches. Mr. Laurens was sent to the Tower and confined,Mr. Laurens was sent to the Tower and confined, at first, with great rigor. After a while, however, his health having given way under the confinement, he was allowed to take the air, at certain stated hours, in the court-yard of his prison. On