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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 273 7 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 109 5 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 74 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 74 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 68 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 38 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 34 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 3, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) or search for Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: December 3, 1861., [Electronic resource], The strongest Fortification in the Confederacy. (search)
The strongest Fortification in the Confederacy. --An army correspondent of the Knoxville (Tenn.) Register, writing from Cumberland Gap, says: Cumberland Gap I consider to be the strongest fortification in the Southern Confederacy, and its natural advantages are such that with little labor and expense it may be made impregnable. I do not believe it will ever be assailed. The enemy know it too well. For one hundred miles in Kentucky, from the Gap, is a perfect wilderness of dense fCumberland Gap I consider to be the strongest fortification in the Southern Confederacy, and its natural advantages are such that with little labor and expense it may be made impregnable. I do not believe it will ever be assailed. The enemy know it too well. For one hundred miles in Kentucky, from the Gap, is a perfect wilderness of dense forest and rugged mountain range, perfectly destitute of forage, and through which an army of any considerable force could not be engineered successfully. Even to ascend the mountain road at the gap seems almost a herculean task, and the invader who climbs it will certainly be in bad condition for a fight after the ascent is accomplished — especially in the face of rifled cannon and Minnie muskets. The various gaps in the Cumberland mountain range are alike difficult of approach on account
to march for the same destination, and will set off to-morrow morning. These troops, with the forces already at Gen. Marshall's camp, and the Kentuckians at Pound Gap, will give that General a handsome little army with which to enter Kentucky and rally the loyal citizens of the Eastern part of that State to the Confederate cause. Gen. Marshall will be in supporting distance of Gen. Zollicoffer, and his presence in Eastern Kentucky will greatly stiffen up our affairs in the direction of Cumberland Gap. Contrary to the rumors which were rife in Richmond about two weeks ago, the enemy never approached Pound Gap much nearer than Piketon. Hearing of the attack of Col. Clarkson's cavalry, from General Floyd's army, on Guyandotte, they took a panic, and, after gathering up all the plunder they could carry from Piketon, took themselves off down the Sandy, and along the road leading westward to Paris. They found, too, that farther progress in that direction was impracticable from the s