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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 39 23 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 30 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 26 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 23 3 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 15 1 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 14 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 11 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 11 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 3, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Northampton (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Northampton (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

The Daily Dispatch: December 3, 1861., [Electronic resource], Proceedings of the enemy on the Eastern Shore. (search)
taching themselves to the State of Maryland, or to Pierpont's caricature of a Goveinment in Wheeling. The force of the enemy in Accomac is four thousand and in Northampton three thousand. They have at present five steamers in Pangoteague creek, which makes up from the Chesapeake into Accomac county! Proclamation to the people of Accomac and Northampton. Whereas, under the proclamation of Gen. Dix, the people of Accomac and Northampton have laid down their arms, and are entitled to the protection of the Federal Government; and whereas serious inconvenience might arise from the suspension of the laws and authorities therein; and whereas the functionaNorthampton have laid down their arms, and are entitled to the protection of the Federal Government; and whereas serious inconvenience might arise from the suspension of the laws and authorities therein; and whereas the functionaries were elected previous to the passage of the so called ordinance of secession, whereby this people put themselves in hostility to the Federal Government; and whereas the responsibilities and duties of said functionaries were sought to be changed by an oath of allegiance to a pretended. Government in rebellion against the Feder
eration with the Confederate authorities is warmly expressed, and his tribute to the Confederate President just and eloquent. The Governor refer in appropriate terms to events in Northwestern Virginia, and utters the full determination of every Virginia when he declares, "When this war ends, Virginia must be what she was when it was in aquarelles. The Ohio river was the Western boundary then and it must continue to be her boundary" In allusion to the recent occupation of Accomac and Northampton, and the necessity of resetting them, he says: "The possession of Maryland is indispensable to us in the present condition of affair on the Eastern Shore and in the Northwest." The Governor transmits the usual reports of the various State officers, and correctly recommends the subject of the currency to legislative action. On the whole, this is the most interesting document that has been issued for many years by a Virginia Executive. It furnishes a noble and glowing page in the his