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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 28 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 14 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 10 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 6 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 2 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 18, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Worcester County (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Worcester County (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

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the struggle Assuming new features, and instead of being a contest for the preservation of the Constitution, is it not growing into a war of subjugation, in which the course first marked out by the Government will be abandoned by the necessity of events? Is there any longer a reasonable hope, after the bitter strife of States and the shedding of fraternal blood, that the Union can ever be restored to its former position? A correspondent of the Boston Courier, writing from Worcester county, Massachusetts, says: The war is not popular, even in Worces or county, and I find the people ready to bring it to an end by any means consistent with honor and patriotism. The troubles with the leaders has been that they were not far-seeing men. They neither knew the temper of the South, nor foresaw the consequence of their policy. This change in sentiment — If it be a change — is the result of an examination of the questions in dispute, and the discovery that the controversy