Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 18, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Wilkes or search for Wilkes in all documents.

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it of literature which appeared recently in the Brooklyn (N. Y.) Times purporting to be founded on a love and matrimonial affair in which Hon. John Slidell and Capt. Wilkes figure as rivals for the same fair hand. The Delta says: "Mr. Slidell came to Louisiana in 1824 or '25, and Capt. Wilkes went into the naval service froCapt. Wilkes went into the naval service from North Carolina perhaps about the same period. Mr. Slidell married his wife about 1840. She is a Creole lady, and Capt. Wilkes was as far removed from her knowledge and her thoughts at the time of her marriage as Louisiana orange blossoms and female beauty are removed from Connecticut snows and pumpkin piety." val service from North Carolina perhaps about the same period. Mr. Slidell married his wife about 1840. She is a Creole lady, and Capt. Wilkes was as far removed from her knowledge and her thoughts at the time of her marriage as Louisiana orange blossoms and female beauty are removed from Connecticut snows and pumpkin piety."
cter, calling on the British Government to demand summary reparation for the insult offered to the flag of the country by the forcible seizure and detention of Messrs. Mason and Slidell, and their Secretaries, Messrs. Ensits and McFarland, by Captain Wilkes, of the San Jacinto. It was further reported, at the time of the departure of the European steamer which brought the foregoing news, that meetings of a similar character to that held at Liverpool, were being called in different parts of e foregoing news, that meetings of a similar character to that held at Liverpool, were being called in different parts of England. The Northern accounts, received last night, show that the news of Wilkes's exploit created a good deal of excitement among the commercial men of Liverpool; but coming to us through a Federal medium, we are left to infer the extent of the impression created upon the public mind throughout England. We refer the reader to the news columns for additional details.