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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 58 2 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 51 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 51 19 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 40 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 38 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 37 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 22 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 22 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 20, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Humphrey Marshall or search for Humphrey Marshall in all documents.

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strongly entrenched camp and fled. I sent my cavalry to the mouth of Jennies Creek, where they attacked and drove the rebel cavalry, which had been left as a vanguard, a distance of five miles, killing three and wounding a considerable number. Marshall's whole army is now flying in utter confusion. He had abandoned and burned a large quantity of stores. We have taken fifteen prisoners. Our loss was two killed and one wounded. I start in pursuit to-morrow morning. J. A. Garfield, Coday noon with 1,100 men, and drove in the enemy's pickets two miles below Prestonsburg The men slept on their arms. At four o'clock yesterday morning we moved towards the main body of the enemy at the forks of Middle creek, under the command of Marshall. Skirmishing with his outposts began at eight o'clock, and at one o'clock P. M. we engaged his force of 2,500, with three cannon posted on the hill. We fought them until dark, having been reinforced by about 700 men from Paintsville, and drove
nvinced that the ship must sink, they have gathered up as much of her treasure as possible, and forsaken her. Their places will be filled it is said, by Mr. Colfax, of Indiana, and Mr. Holt, of Kentucky The report which reached us that Humphrey Marshall had cut up the Yankees is corf corroborated by intelligence from the North.-- Our informant states, that notwithstanding their newspaper accounts of a great vicar, over Gen. Marshall, that in Baltimore the fact is known that such was not tGen. Marshall, that in Baltimore the fact is known that such was not the case, hu that as usual the Yankees were defeated with a very heavy loss. We further learn that five regiments we sent out to attack Gen. Price. Their obj was to take him by surprise, and they counted upon an easy victory. They counted without their host, however, as the sequel proved. They met with a terrible defeat — a large proportion of them being killed and the reminder taken prisoners. The Burnside expedition, it seems, was really fitted out for the purpose of making demo