Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 25, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Burnside or search for Burnside in all documents.

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. A considerable quantity of clothing, &c., occasionally pass through our city from the North, for the Federal prisoners in the South. These goods, packed usually in large boxes, bales, &c, are brought up in the steamers that go down with flag of truce, and are generally forwarded by the Southern Express Company. This company, by the way, is of great public benefit, and is managed according to a judicious and admirable system, which ensures the safe delivery of packages forwarded, not only with certainty, but in the shortest possible time. Several persons have been fined by the Mayor for issuing small notes. The extensive issue of them, which is still on the increase, seems to have required the enforcement of the law on the subject. There is no late news here from the fleet, which has been expected in the Sound. We shall soon have the particulars of the proceedings of Burnside down there, and not unlikely of a severe conflict between his ships and our batteries
ficer and a well disciplined and brave army under him, that have been a long time waiting anxiously for the appearance of the enemy some way or other. More deliberate and terrible salvos which quieted the ferocious drown may have some effect on Burnside. Burnside is certainly now presented in a questionable shape. Where and when he will throw his thunderbolts are questions not be answered except by himself. Should the weather not frustrate him altogether, we suppose he will soon let us kand a well disciplined and brave army under him, that have been a long time waiting anxiously for the appearance of the enemy some way or other. More deliberate and terrible salvos which quieted the ferocious drown may have some effect on Burnside. Burnside is certainly now presented in a questionable shape. Where and when he will throw his thunderbolts are questions not be answered except by himself. Should the weather not frustrate him altogether, we suppose he will soon let us know.
tanding the weather was exceedingly unfavorable in consequence of the muddy streets and a raging snow storm, which commenced about 8 o'clock.--The President was in fine spirits over the news of the victory in Kentucky, and the safe arrival of Gen. Burnside in Pamlico Sound. He had a cheerful word to say to most every person who paid their respects to him. Mrs. Lincoln appeared in pure white, her dress being an elegant figured brocade. She was escorted through the great East Room by Gen. Camert on to New Orleans, on furlough. He was taken while fishing off that port. The Philadelphia train brought them on yesterday afternoon. They were taken to the South Ferry, and thence by the Hamilton Avenue cars to Fort Lafayette. The Burnside expedition. We copy the following, from the Norfolk Day Book, of the 24th inst.: A gentleman who reached this city, direct from the North Carolina coast, addresses us a communication, in which he states, that the report of Gen. Gatlin