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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 56 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 13 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 28, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Carondelet or search for Carondelet in all documents.

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ding of an additional hundred million of dollars in United States notes, and making them a legal tender. The Western gun-boat fleet β€” description of the gun-boats. The following description of the gun-boats, furnished by a Cairo correspondent of the Cincinnati Gazette, is interesting: The gun-boats intended for the Mississippi are twelve in number, (including those altered from steamboats, and which have been some time in use,) and may be classed as follows: Benton, St. Louis, Carondelet, Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Louisville, Mound City, and Cairo β€” all new, and built especially for gun-boats β€” not quite finished as yet, but will probably be completed and ready for service in a week of ten days. The first named is the flag-ship, and cased on all the sides and front, and other exposed parts, with 2ΒΌ inch iron, the thickness diminishing at the less exposed points. She is one hundred and eighty-five feet in length, and mounts eighteen heavy guns, six on each side, three in the