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with the reflection that it was foolish for them to have ever thought of holding the islands against our powerful navy; but when we attempted to leave the cover of our men-of-war and attack them on the main land, they would be ready for us. Mason and Slidell. The news of the capture of Mason and Slidell at once brought gold down from thirty-five to fifteen per cent, premium. Confidence in their Government increased as the prospect of war between the United States and England appearedMason and Slidell at once brought gold down from thirty-five to fifteen per cent, premium. Confidence in their Government increased as the prospect of war between the United States and England appeared, and they were jubilant accordingly. The subsequent release was a crushing disappointment, and under the depression gold mounted rapidly again to an exorbitant premium. Their spirit — about our fighting. They have made up their mind that the North must be as well convinced by this time as they are of the impossibility of reconstructing the Union, and must, therefore, be waging the war as one of subjugation, Against this, former Union men will fight as readily as original secessionist
ge just the same as white people. Mr. Rhett himself, who owned a large number of slaves, built a church, and specially employed a preacher for their edification. One great cause of the rebellion, which he omitted to speak of yesterday, was the division of the church--North and South. Mr. Harlan, (Rep.,) of Iowa, said, that on a former occasion, in debate on this subject, several Senators from the South stated essentially the same facts, but were rebuked by the Senator from Virginia (Mr. Mason) with the declaration that it was the policy of the South not to teach the slaves. Mr. Cowan, (Rep.,) of Pa., said that he had a very slight acquaintance with the opposed him in his political dogmas. He (Mr. Cowan) was as much in favor of putting down the rebellion as any one. He claimed that in examining this case the Senate must be governed by the salle rules as if they were as jurors. The charge against the Senator from Indiana is that of treason. There cannot be any half-way c