Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 6, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Hunter or search for Hunter in all documents.

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of the Sixty ninth New York regiment, a prisoner of war has arrived from Columbia, South Carolina, and was present at the interview with the President and Secretary of State. He reports that the health of Colonel Corcoran and the other prisoners there is good. The position of Gen. Lane The President, in conversation yesterday with Representative Conway, of Kansas, stated that he appointed James H. Lane Brigadier General, with the express understanding that he was to serve under General Hunter; that General Lane frequently declared his willingness to do so; that he (the President) had and has the strongest desire to oblige General Lane, and consequently appointed a large staff to suit and gratify him Arrest of rebel Sympathizers. Information has reached here that Isaiah Butler, David C. Wattles, Matthew Modge, and Richard R. Boyle, have been arrested at North Branch, Michigan, on the borders of Canada; upon the charge of destroying the mails at the Post office, in ret
ross eyes, in his own peculiar way, and realizing the ludicrous fact, he exclaimed, after a hem or two, with his usual hesitancy of utterance: "Ah ! eh ! why 'tis Hunter's blue stocking !" (meaning Senator Hunter, of Virginia, the Judge's room-mate in Washington.) This unexpected explanation of the funny incident only the more setSenator Hunter, of Virginia, the Judge's room-mate in Washington.) This unexpected explanation of the funny incident only the more set "laughter shaking both his sides," and swelled the uproar, until the very roof rang with the merry peal. After order and silence had been restored, the Judge humorously confessed the awkwardness of his predicament, and explained that, in a fit of absence, after performing his toilet, he had unconsciously, along with his handkerchief, thrust one of Mr. Hunter's stockings into his pocket; and added, "for Heaven's sake, don't tell that woman, Mrs. C**y, of it." The prohibition was, of course, disregarded, and Mrs. C**y was soon put in possession of the story. Thereupon, with that kindly humor and ready wit which, with her many virtues, graces and acco
Turnpike, as a military necessity, as well as public convenience. On motion of Mr. Bunter, the House took up the unfinished business of yesterday morning, which was the consideration of the proposed amendments to the substitute of fared by Mr. Hunter to the bill providing for the construction of a railroad connection, for military purposes, from Strasburg, on the Manassas Gap Railroad, to Winchester, on the Winchester and Potomac Railroad. Mr. Hunter concluded his argument against Mr. substitute of fared by Mr. Hunter to the bill providing for the construction of a railroad connection, for military purposes, from Strasburg, on the Manassas Gap Railroad, to Winchester, on the Winchester and Potomac Railroad. Mr. Hunter concluded his argument against Mr. Stager's amendments, and was followed by Mr. Stager,whose remarks were cut short by the Speaker's hammer, the hour for the consideration of the Military bill having arrived. The House then went into secret session.