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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,016 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 573 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 458 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 394 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 392 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 384 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 304 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 258 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 256 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 244 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 11, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) or search for Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

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aboard island, not as advantageously situated, nor encompassed by as rich surroundings of country, as Beanfort. His object is supposed by some to be Norfolk. but if we are on believe the recent outgivings of Northern journals, his leading purpose is to make a demonstration against the Weldon and Wilmington railroad, with a view to cutting our great line of Southern communication. That thing seems for the present, to be the especial aim of the enemy in every quarter. His movements in Western Kentucky and Tennessee seem to have that single object for the present in view, and it has been repeatedly declared by Northern journals that Burnside's primary purpose is a demonstration upon our railroad. It remains to be seen whether such be his real design, and with what success he will prosecute it. The experience of Sherman in a similar undertaking may possibly be his own. An assault upon Norfolk is the only object next after this railroad enterprise, commensurate in importance with
The Daily Dispatch: February 11, 1862., [Electronic resource], Re-enlistment of volunteers.--no Coorcien. (search)
Appropriation for Kentucky. The injunction of secresy has been removed from a hill passed by Congress, appropriating two million dollars for the benefit of the State of Kentucky.
The Daily Dispatch: February 11, 1862., [Electronic resource], What the North Thiske of the war thus far. (search)
n a dark and bloody ground indeed to the rebels who have invaded it. In no considersble skirmish in that State have the rebels been auccessful, and their centre is broken by a splendid Union victory, which practically annihilates a whole division of their army. The rebels have been entirely foiled in endeavoring to wrest Western Virginia from the United States troops. General Lee retired in despair from Greenbrier, and Gen. Floyd ran away from Cotton Mountain. Two rebel raids into Eastern Kentucky have been met and repulsed, and at last accounts Humphrey Marshall, and his discomfitted followers, utterly demoralized, were running through Pound Gap. An army of near twenty thousand men, under General Lander, looks up the Valley of Virginia toward Winchester. The gun-boat fleet at Cairo is well advanced, and there will be no difficulty, presently, when Gen Halleck pacifies Missouri, in starting the long talked of Mississippi expedition by land and river, in proportions commensurate