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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16,340 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 3,098 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2,132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,974 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,668 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,628 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,386 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,340 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1,170 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 1,092 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 11, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for United States (United States) or search for United States (United States) in all documents.

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Europe. --All the Yankee correspondents in Europe represent the existence of a most threatening state of feeling towards the United States. The blockade of stone and the great want of cotton in all the menufacturing towns of England and France will soon raise a storm that will most effectually blow old Abe's ships from our coast. The working people everywhere call loudly for intervention.
te may forth with resume her participation in the councils of the Union. I do furthermore direct that, upon the same day aforesaid, the polls be opened for the election of representatives in the Congress of the United States to fill existing vacancies. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the great seal of the State to be affixed, at Hatter as, this 22d of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, and of the independence of the United States the eighty-sixth. Marble Nash Taylor. Federal account of the Partial Destruction of Harper's Ferry. Sandy Hock, Md., Feb. 7, 1862. --This forenoon Capt. Baylor and three of his men, concealed themselves behind a stone wall, just, above Harper's Ferry bridge, when one of them, either black or painted, by displaying a flag of truce, induced a loyal Virginian over. When nearly across, Capt. Baylor and two others fired and killed the ferryman. Our batteries on the heig
The Daily Dispatch: February 11, 1862., [Electronic resource], Re-enlistment of volunteers.--no Coorcien. (search)
his important frontier, you have driven back the immense army which the enemy had sent to invade our country and to establish his dominion over our people by the wide-spread havoc of a war inaugurated without a shadow of constitutional right, and prosecuted in a spirit of ruthless vengeance. By your valor and firmness you have kept him in check until the nations of the earth have been forced to see us in our true character — not dismembered and rebellious communities, but an empire of confederate States, with a Constitution safe in the affections of the people, institutions and laws in full and unobstructed operation a population enjoying all the comforts of life, and a citizen soldiery who laugh to scorn the threat of subjugation. Your country now summons you to a nobler and a greater deed. The enemy has gathered up all his energies for a final conflict. His enormous masses threaten us on the West; his naval expeditions are assailing us upon our whole Southern coast, and upon
The Daily Dispatch: February 11, 1862., [Electronic resource], What the North Thiske of the war thus far. (search)
The military bill Passes. The bill to raise troops to meet the requisition on Virginia, by the President of the Confederate States, passed both branches of the General Assembly yesterday, in secret session, after being amended in several particulars. It provides that all the companies now in the field shall be filled up to the number of 100 men each; that the Governor shall call for volunteers, and if the requisite number be not thus enlisted, the deficiency is to be made up by draft from the enrolled militia. When the term of enlistment of the men now in the field terminates, those falling to reenlist will be subject to draft with the militia; but if drafted, will not be called into service for a period of forty days. The bill allows the procurement of substitutes. It is recommended to Government to give volunteers a furlough of sixty days, at such times as may be most convenient. It is assumed that, by the operation of this act, the State of Virginia will have in the fi
The Patent office. We have a copy of the report of Rufus R Rhodes, Esq., Commissioner of Patents, giving a history of the operations of the office under his control, and showing its condition on the 1st of January, 1862, from which we make up the following brief summary: Number of applications for patents during the past year , 304; caveats, 110; patents issued, 57; United States patents and assignments thereof recorded, 112; amount of fees received, $9,000.90; amount of expenditures, $6,188.28; excess of receipts over expenditures, $2,812.62. The patents issued were distributed among the several States thus: To citizens of Virginia, 15; Georgia, 9; Alabama, 7; Louisiana, 6; North Carolina, 5; South Carolina, 4; Mississippi, 4; Tennessee, 3; Arkansas, 2; Florida, 1; Texas, 1. Eighteen of the patents that have been allowed cover improvements in fire-arms, or other destructive implements of war; and with the view of showing that some of them have striking merit, the Commissioner p
The United States and Hayti. --A Northern correspondent writes thus of the proposed mission to Hayti: Great Britain is now represented at Portan-Prince by Spencer St. John, France by the Marquis De Forbin Janson, and Spain by Senor Antonio Alvarez, each having diplomatic functions and a secretary of legation. Russia, Beigium, Holland, the Hanse Towns, Austris, Norway, Sweeden and Denmark, have all Consul-Generals there, and we are the only Power not represented, and by whom Hayti is not secognized by treaty. Yet, we have commercial relations there, receiving coffee, logwood, mahogany, sugar, cotton, and tropical fruits, for which we exchange flour, beef, pork fish, oil furniture, dry goods, and hardware. Repugnance to the African race, and an willingness to admit their equality in any way, has prevented the establishement of diplomatic relations with Hayti, as well as with Liberia. Even now it is urged that such a step will offend the delicate susceptibilities of ma
ill for connecting the Manassas Gap with the Winchester and Potomac Railroad was referred to the appropriate committee and ordered to be printed. Bills reported. Mr. Cogrill, from the Committee for Courts of Justice, reported the following bills: To authorize the Courts and Common Concils or Trustees of counties, cities, and towns to provide for the widows and minor children of deceased or disabled soldiers; to authorize the use of the jails and poor-houses of the State, by the Confederate States, for the safe-keeping of free negroes arrested by military authority. The same committee reported adversely to the resolution to amend the 5th section of chapter 184 of the Code. Mr. Robertson, by leave, presented a bill amending the 8th section of chapter 186 of the Code, in respect to judgment liens on real estate. The land office. Mr. Massie, of Goochland, presented the report of the joint committee appointed to examine the Register's office, which was aid on the
"Trophies." We invite attention to the advertisement signed by Captain E. P. Alexander, in relation to arms captured from the United States in battle, which, in a large number of instances, are retained by private citizens as trophies. All such arms are the property of the Confederate States, and we need hardly say that the country needs them for her soldiers in the field. We hope the press throughout the South will allude to this matter, and that every man having such a trophy will givattention to the advertisement signed by Captain E. P. Alexander, in relation to arms captured from the United States in battle, which, in a large number of instances, are retained by private citizens as trophies. All such arms are the property of the Confederate States, and we need hardly say that the country needs them for her soldiers in the field. We hope the press throughout the South will allude to this matter, and that every man having such a trophy will give it up without hesitation.
ertson, of Richmond, objected, and the resolation laid over under the rule. On motion of Mr. Dabney, the House took up and considered the bill authorizing the County Court of Powhatan to correct the assessment on the lands of A. S. Woolbridge's estate. The bill was passed. The following resolution of inquiry into expediency was adopted: By Mr. Anderson, of Botetourt — Of incorporating a company to manufacture salt at Big Lick, in Roanoke county. Mr. McCamant offered the following, which was adopted: Resolved, That leave be given to bring in a bill providing for the confiscation of lands of citizens of the United States, west of the Alleghanies, and transferring to loyal citizens of the Commonwealth, right to so much as they may have just title or claim to under grants from the Commonwealth. On motion of Mr. Robertson, of Richmond, the House went into secret session, on the bill to organize the Virginia forces. The bill was passed, with amendments.
A portion of the grounds selected for the Grand Industrial Exhibition of 1862, at London, has been set apart for the Confederate States. What we will have to exhibit that will compete with European manufacture, is not said; but it is a significant fact that this appropriation to the South has heretofore been granted only to recognized nations.
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