Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 26, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for McClellan or search for McClellan in all documents.

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der the impression that the United States cause was going to the bottom, and give place to another man, that the tide of Northern reverses began to turn. We know that his self conceit is enormous, and feel quite sure that he will patronize McClellan in a fatherly way, and speak of him to his friends as a promising young man, taking all the credit of all that has been done, however, to his own advice and suggestions. But nobody will believe him. This war, which has revealed many men to the a General. His conduct to his old military contemporary, the veteran Wool, a better man than himself, whom he has contrived to throw in the background during the whole of the war, and whom he feared as a rival, shows that he is incapable of magnanimity, and can descend to any means for his own selfish purpose. McClellan will yet find in Scott a secret and underhand enemy, who never forgives an object that throws a shadow on his path, whether it be a transient vapor or the wing of an eagle.
een looking forward with earnest hope and expectancy. Lying passive so long in winter quarters, and having now no hand in accomplishing the splendid victories daily crowning the Union forces along the Southern frontiers and in the South and West, is deeply galling to them. A belief that to them will be entrusted the honor of giving the final deathblow to the rebellion, and the chance to win victories and glory before the war ends, alone inspire patience and undiminished confidence in General McClellan, who they know, when the right time comes, will give the order of "Forward, march!" and the coveted opportunity to signalize their patriotism on the battle-field. Release of State prisoners. Washington, Feb. 21. --The following prisoners of State will be released on the 22d instant, by order of the War Department, on their parole of honor to render no aid or comfort to the enemy in hostility to the Government of the United States, in accordance, with the terms of the Execu
Gen. McClellan. The Federal Commander-in-Chief, General McClellan, finds it impossible, even after the recent Federal successes, to give satisfaction to the "On to Richmond" gentry of the LincolGeneral McClellan, finds it impossible, even after the recent Federal successes, to give satisfaction to the "On to Richmond" gentry of the Lincoln Congress and press. A member of Congress openly declares that McClellan is the only obstacle to complete success, and that great military critic, Horace Greeley, ridicules the idea that McClellan McClellan is the only obstacle to complete success, and that great military critic, Horace Greeley, ridicules the idea that McClellan is entitled to the credit of the Federal victories in the Southwest. It is unfortunate for McClellan that he has the reputation of being a gentleman, which, with many of his party, the Tribune schooMcClellan is entitled to the credit of the Federal victories in the Southwest. It is unfortunate for McClellan that he has the reputation of being a gentleman, which, with many of his party, the Tribune school especially, is considered as great a crime as being a slaveholder. It is unfortunate for McClellan that he has the reputation of being a gentleman, which, with many of his party, the Tribune school especially, is considered as great a crime as being a slaveholder.