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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 111 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 78 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 50 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 49 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 38 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 10, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

and and France. In the British House of Lords, on the 14th ult, the Earl of Stanhope made a speech in relation to the obstructions of Mamit's Channel, in Charleston harbor, and put several questions to Earl Russell, the Foreign Secretary, touching the stone blockade. In conclusion he said: The permanent destruction of a truction of the harbors. In conversing with the American Minister at this Court, that was the view which he took. He said that the permanent destruction of Charleston harbor was impossible; that the two rivers which formed the harbor would be sure to make a channel, and that it was impossible, even if it had been intended, to effewspaper opinion.[from the London Herald.] The Federal Government is again at its work of hostility to mankind. More stone laden ships have been sunk in Charleston harbor, to compel the destruction which was intended, but not achieved, by the first expedition. What have their friends to say for them now? The excuse urged for
e traitors who burned the dwelling of the Messrs. McDonald, of Wyoming, has been arrested and committed to jail in Tazewell county, Va. A difficulty recently occurred between Col. John A. Alken, jr., and James B. Boss, partners in trade, at Jonesborough, Tenn., in which the Jatter was killed. At the request of the citizens of Petersburg, President Davis has determined to declare martial law over that city and the surrounding country. The British ship Rinaldo arrived off Charleston harbor on Tuesday last, and communicated with the British Consul there. The City Council of Lynchburg have adopted resolutions asking the President to establish martial law in that place. Miss. Jennie C. Ludlam, daughter of Henry Ludlam, of New York, died recently in Paris, of typhoid fever. Daniel H. Kerr, of Fairfield District, S. C., who served in the war of 1812, died lately at an advanced age. Hewitt's block, in Cleveland, Ohio, was burned on the night of the 4th inst