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enable him to establish such depositories, so as to secure a prompt supply of funds for the public service at distant points. Mr. Johnson complained that these depositories were absolutely necessary, and that parties were now obliged to travel all the way here from the Southwest when they desired funds for the use of the army, at great expense and delay. Mr. Barkwell, of S. C., stated that there were depositories at the places indicated, and the delays, &c., must proceed from other causes. Still he thought it advisable to make the inquiry. Mr. Clarke was glad the subject was brought before the House. Since Gen. Price's army of Missouri had been transferred to the Confederate States, there has been great inconvenience and danger in transporting large sums of money in boxes over exposed country. He advocated the establishment of depositories at Fort Smith and Little Rock Arkansas. The resolution was agreed to, and afterwards the Senate went into secret session.
nsas: To Major-General McClellon, Washington: The army of the Southwest, under Gen. Curtis, after three day's hard fighting near Sugar Creek, Arkansas, has gained a most glorious victory over the combined forces of Van-Dorn, McCallech, Price, and McIntosh. Our loss is estimated at one thousand killed and wounded. That of the enemy is still larger. Guns, flags, provisions, &c., have been captured in large quantities. Our cavalry are in pursuit of the flying enemy. [Sss is estimated at one thousand killed and wounded. That of the enemy is still larger. Guns, flags, provisions, &c., have been captured in large quantities. Our cavalry are in pursuit of the flying enemy. [Signed,] H. W. Halleck, Major-General Commanding St. Louis, March 10. --The expedition sent out from Sedalla, by Brig-Gen. McKean, into Bates county, has just returned with 40 prisoners of war — recruits for Price's army — and a quantity of arms and ammunition.
The battle in Arkansas. We have no further intelligence of the great battle in Arkansas, except that which comes from the enemy, and is, therefore, to be received with distrust. Our dispatches from Memphis, published yesterday, are as late as the Federal accounts, and we still cherish the hope that our forces have achieved a victory which will turn the tide of war in our favor in the West. Our confidence in Generals Price and Van-Dorn assures us that if the chances were anything like equal, the enemy has nothing to boast of.