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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 690 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 662 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 310 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 188 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 174 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 152 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 148 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 142 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 130 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 14, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) or search for Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 4 document sections:

ands in the office had been called off by the militia draft. On motion of Mr. Hill, of Ga., the bill providing for the payment for horses lost in the Fishing Creek battle, was transferred to the secret session calendar. Mr. Johnson, of Arkansas, offered the following: Resolved, That the Secretary of the Treasury be directed to inform the senate whether any and what depositories of funds, he has established at Memphis, New Orleans, and other cities or posts of the Confederate Statauses. Still he thought it advisable to make the inquiry. Mr. Clarke was glad the subject was brought before the House. Since Gen. Price's army of Missouri had been transferred to the Confederate States, there has been great inconvenience and danger in transporting large sums of money in boxes over exposed country. He advocated the establishment of depositories at Fort Smith and Little Rock Arkansas. The resolution was agreed to, and afterwards the Senate went into secret session.
issing is supposed to be about 100. The Monitor was honored with salutes and cheers, both from the fort and the fleet, on her return. Everybody was enthusiastic in her praise for the good services she rendered yesterday. The battle in Arkansas. It appears by the following official dispatch that the Yankees claim a victory over the Confederate forces in Arkansas: To Major-General McClellon, Washington: The army of the Southwest, under Gen. Curtis, after three day's hard Arkansas: To Major-General McClellon, Washington: The army of the Southwest, under Gen. Curtis, after three day's hard fighting near Sugar Creek, Arkansas, has gained a most glorious victory over the combined forces of Van-Dorn, McCallech, Price, and McIntosh. Our loss is estimated at one thousand killed and wounded. That of the enemy is still larger. Guns, flags, provisions, &c., have been captured in large quantities. Our cavalry are in pursuit of the flying enemy. [Signed,] H. W. Halleck, Major-General Commanding St. Louis, March 10. --The expedition sent out from Sedalla, by
e sustained is much greater than the Northern journals allow, and it is thought that it will result in a total loss of eight. He is compelled to wear bandages over both eyes, and is accompanied by a guide when he goes abroad. The battle in Arkansas. The Philadelphia Inquirer, of the 11th inst., contains a dispatch with reference to the fight in Arkansas, in which it is stated that their loss is one thousand killed and that ours is about the same. It claims a victory for the Federal armArkansas, in which it is stated that their loss is one thousand killed and that ours is about the same. It claims a victory for the Federal arms, and states that our forces were being pursued by their cavalry. The reader may believe as much of this statement as he chooses. We opine, however, that he will not believe much of it when we tell him that the same paper also claims the recent engagement in Hampton Roads as a victory for their side. Federal falsehood. We have the authority, through the 1st Lieutenant of the French corvette, and also the French Consul of this city, on the part of the commander of that vessel, to s
The battle in Arkansas. We have no further intelligence of the great battle in Arkansas, except that which comes from the enemy, and is, therefore, to be received with distrust. Our dispatches from Memphis, published yesterday, are as late as the Federal accounts, and we still cherish the hope that our forces have achieved a victory which will turn the tide of war in our favor in the West. Our confidence in Generals Price and Van-Dorn assures us that if the chances were anything like equ further intelligence of the great battle in Arkansas, except that which comes from the enemy, and is, therefore, to be received with distrust. Our dispatches from Memphis, published yesterday, are as late as the Federal accounts, and we still cherish the hope that our forces have achieved a victory which will turn the tide of war in our favor in the West. Our confidence in Generals Price and Van-Dorn assures us that if the chances were anything like equal, the enemy has nothing to boast of.