hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 224 2 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 172 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 153 117 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 152 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 136 14 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 132 12 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 86 4 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 80 2 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 78 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 78 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 8, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) or search for Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

to keep the enemy at bay. In the latter case they will be able to make their way down the Mississippi, leaving their guns and stores behind. Their gunboats and transports would probably be destroyed rather than they should fall into our hands. The announcement comes at a late hour that our naval officers have learned of the preparation of the rebel gunboats, and are making preparations for a strenuous resistance. The gunboats now at the island are, with one exception, not iron clad. One of them the Grampus, so famous for her speed, is the property of a Northern man, which was ruthlessly seized from her owner, Capt. Chester, of Pittsburg, last may, and himself treated with indignity in Memphis last spring Captain Chester is now in command of a faster craft, and on by desires to have a fair chance at her, and he will run her down or recaptured this boat. The wickedness of that rebellion is seen more clearly by this wholesale of Northern weapons to be used against ourselves.
nection these with that it may be possible to obtain previous to the receipt of detailed accounts. Judging from the wording of General Beauregard's dispatch, it is presumed that the battle took place at Shiloh Church, three miles southwest of Pittsburg and eighteen miles northeast of Corinth, Miss. It will therefore probably be known in history as the "Battle of Shiloh" The Vicksburg Whig, of the 29th ult, used the following propretic language: We are in the midst of the deep tranquilee passage along the river, but the two wooden gunboats, the Lexington and A. O. Taylor, have served an admirable purpose as a roving police, preventing the erection of batteries, and silencing the only one that had been completed — that at Pittsburg Landing, nine miles above. Above East port, at Chickasaw Bluffs and some other points, the Rebels are understood to have batteries that command the navigation of the river, and protect Florence and Decatur from attack by water for the present.