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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 360 128 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 94 6 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 70 20 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 68 8 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 42 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 38 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 38 14 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 37 3 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 37 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 22, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Huntsville (Alabama, United States) or search for Huntsville (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 4 document sections:

The descent upon Huntsville. Our readers have been informed of the descent upon Huntsville. Ala., by thHuntsville. Ala., by the Federals, their taking possession of the town and railroad, and capturing a passenger train, together with td arrived here to-day, having made their way from Huntsville, which they left on Sunday, the 13th. From them Saturday last there were 7,000 Federal troops at Huntsville. On Sunday 5,000 were sent to Decatur and Corintadditional force of 10,000 were expected to reach Huntsville engines and a large number of cars, and pressed tey have already commenced running a daily mail to Huntsville, and are doing quite a driving business on their eport, Jackson county, Ala., seventeen miles from Huntsville, where he will establish headquarters for the pre 2,000 strong, retreated when the Yankees entered Huntsville. A gentleman who recently escaped from the lattet is believed that the Yankees will soon evacuate Huntsville, as a point too much exposed to suit their purpos
An Extraordinary Adventure. --The Atlanta Confederacy, of the 17th inst., relates the following: Yesterday evening Captain J. T. Montgomery arrived here from Corinth, whither he had gone when the wires first flashed the news of Sunday's great fight. After staying there till he desired to return, he left on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad Wednesday night, the 9th, and arrived at Huntsville next morning, no one on board dreaming that the Yankees were in the place. He was in the hinomost car, and, as the train stopped, he heard some one say, "the Yankees have got us;" and looking out, he saw them thick as been around the engine, and coming down along the line of the train. He quickly stopped out, took a back street, and was soon out of sight. Near the out skirts of the town he entered a house, exchanged his uniform for citizen's clothes, came back into town, hired a horse and buggy and negro driver, at a livery stable, and started for the Tennessee river at the neares
rious in time to reinforce the former position. The War in Arkansas. St. Louis, April 14. --The correspondent of the Missouri Democrat, writing from Houston, Mo. under date of April 9th, says: "The whole Confederate force in the late Pea Ridge battle have gone east down the Arkansas river. A little over a week ago they passed through Clarksville, sixty miles east of Van-Buren. At that point a force of two thousand cavalry was said to have taken the road North, towards Huntsville. It is impossible to learn the destination of these troops, but it is most probable that they were bound for some point on the Mississippi river, near Jacksonport, Ark. It is also reported that the rebels at Pocahontas have orders, on the appearance of a Union force, to retreat to Jacksonport. Gen. Price and the Missouri State Guard were left at Van-Buren. Col. Wood, who is in command of the U. States forces in Houston, is kept busy watching the enemy, and keeps them lack i
ould the report prove correct, it would indicate that they intend to make a flank movement in the direction of Richmond, while McClellan plays the port of a decoy upon the Peninsula. Another report is that General Ewell's division has fallen back from the Rappahannock to Gordonsville. It is inferred from this that a junction of the forces of Generals Jackson and Ewell is in contemplation. Advices from the Peninsula inform us that the skirmishing continues, and our troops feel perfectly confident of a victory whenever the enemy shall accept the offer of battle. Our mails from the Southwest are several days overdue, and we have no means of procuring any reliable intelligence from that quarter. The telegraph has a report, "brought by passengers," that Nashville has been retaken by our forces under Generals Kirby Smith and Humphrey Marshall. If Huntsville were substituted for Nashville, we should credit the report; but as it is, we do not deem it entitled to belief.