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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 8 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 6 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 6 6 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 7, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for April 25th, 1862 AD or search for April 25th, 1862 AD in all documents.

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more coming. The Watson took a load of passengers across the lake before she finally left. Fort Pike was evacuated and the gun-carriages burning as she passed. About 10,000 bales of cotton were burned in the city, and perhaps 1,000 escaped the flames. A large fire was seen in the city Friday night, but what it was could not be made out. We append Mayor Monroe's proclamation to the citizens: To the people of New Orleans. Mayoralty of New Orleans, City Hall, April 25, 1862. After an obstinate and heroic defence by our troops on the river, there appears to be imminent danger that the insolent enemy will succeed in capturing your city. The forts have not fallen. They have not succumbed even beneath the terrors of a bombardment unparalleled in the history of war fare. Their defenders have done all that becomes men fighting for their homes, their country, and their liberty; but in spite of their efforts, the ships of the enemy have been able to avoid