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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 135 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 117 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 63 1 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 1, April, 1902 - January, 1903 59 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 53 9 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 50 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 38 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 33 13 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 3 Browse Search
John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 29, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for James or search for James in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

a military guard going last night, by order of Gen. Wadsworth, the military. Governor, to the jail to take away a colored girl belonging to Mrs. Allnott, of Prince George's county, Maryland, and because of the jailor (Mr. B. Milburn) declining to deliver her up, placing him and the Deputy Marshal (Mr. Phillips) under a military arrest, and taken possession of the keys of the prison and the prison itself. These two officials were taken to the guard house, while Messrs Joseph H. Bradley and James M Carlisle, both prominent members of the bar, the first council for the claimant of the slave, who in the meantime went to the jail in their official capacity, were held within its walls as prisoners also. At a late hour of the night however, the U. S. Marshal of the District, Col. Lamon, having duly summoned the police, went with Police Superintendent Webb and Sergeant Cronin to the jail, and in turn placed under arrest the Military Sergeant and sentry who had been left in charge, releasi
The Daily Dispatch: may 29, 1862., [Electronic resource], The freedom of the press in New Orleans. (search)
Police Court. --In the absence, yesterday, of the usual sitting magistrate at the above popular place of resort, Recorder James K Caskie did the honors of the occasion with that ease and expedition which ever characterizes that gentleman's ministration on the bench of justice, and which denotes the possession of an eye quick to see and a comprehension adequate to any occasion. Charles Toothaker, representing himself as a member of Imboden's Battery, was arraigned for steeling from the Columbian Hotel, on Friday night, a hand trunk, containing clothing valued at $49, the property of a boarder named E J. Stewart. The name prisoner was also arraigned for stealing at the same time a carpet sack, containing $29 worth of clothing, &c., belonging to Wm. S. Wilkinson, on the same night. It appeared that Mr. Luck, manager of the Hotel, had seen the accused loitering about the Hotel before supper-time on. Tuesday night, and had ordered him away. He pretended to go but while Mr. Luck
Notice. --Ranaway from the subscriber, near Dayton, Marengo county, Ala., my dining-room servant, James, sometimes calling himself James Clarke, a bright mulatto, about twenty-five years of age, slightly bowlegged, was raised in Richmond, Va., by a Mr. Totty. His parents still live there.--James was in the army last summer at Winchester. A reasonable reward will be paid for his apprehension and confinement in jail so that I get him again. my 10--1m* Edward Baptist. Notice. --Ranaway from the subscriber, near Dayton, Marengo county, Ala., my dining-room servant, James, sometimes calling himself James Clarke, a bright mulatto, about twenty-five years of age, slightly bowlegged, was raised in Richmond, Va., by a Mr. Totty. His parents still live there.--James was in the army last summer at Winchester. A reasonable reward will be paid for his apprehension and confinement in jail so that I get him again. my 10--1m* Edward Baptist.