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The Daily Dispatch: May 30, 1862., [Electronic resource], Ready for battle — a desperate conflict approaching — Butler's infamous order--Dr. Palmer, of New Orleans — movements of the enemy, &c. (search)
Ready for battle — a desperate conflict approaching — Butler's infamous order--Dr. Palmer, of New Orleans — movements of the enemy, &c. Corinte, Miss., May 21, 1862. Nothing to add to my notations of yesterday, beyond the fact that to-day will probably bring on the long-anticipated battle. While I write, heavy discharges of artillery are reverberating from the centre, our troops are all in position, and some movements are on foot which are likely to lead to a general engagement. The ehind their entrenchments, and these will severally have to be carried by storm. Halleck is too wily to trust his forces to the open field, and run the chances of an utter rout. A side from this , our men are perfectly indignant at the order of Butler, which, as I telegraphed you, had been republished as a general order by Beauregard, and, animated by the thought of outraged women, will "fight to the death." Dr. Palmer, of New Orleans, yesterday delivered a stirring address to about five <
Correction. --The article copied into this paper last Monday, on the course of Picayune Butler, and credited to the Wilmington Journal originally appeared in the Savannah Republican.
circumstance a whole party of these wanted to surrender and give up the place against the will and command of their Chief. "Go," said he, "tell the remains of our ancestors to spring up from their graves and to follow us into a new land" They remained, fought, and resisted. Otempora, O Mores How long shall these things be tolerated? How long shall our Southern ladies be allowed to remain under the tyrannical yoke of our Northern oppressors, subject to the despotism of such bipeds as Butler and consorts, remains to our Generals to decide. Jackson is already in the field, "Onward ! onward !" is the motto which come to us from Corinth; let, then, the heroes of Manassas, together with their brethren of Bethel, row righting on the banks of the Chickahominy, respond to the call, and so certain as there is a just God, who presides over the destinies of nations, victory shall crown our efforts, and Yankeeism shall soon be swept from our southwestern homes. Above all, do not