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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 60 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 50 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 44 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 34 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 32 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 2, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Stonewall or search for Stonewall in all documents.

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In their accounts they speak of Banks's army as greatly infecter in numbers to Jackson's. They style it "the feeble column of Gen Banks." Nevertheless, it is evident that great alarm has been caused by Jackson's sudden appearance upon the banks of the Potomac. There is a great stir among the new recruits in New York and places of renderings in the West. The Philadelphus Inquirer blows tremendously about the new regiments going forward, and thinks they will strike terror to the heart of "Stonewall" Gen. Jackson is one of those resolute and ever watchful commanders who are not to be taken by surprise, and will not be alarmed by mere report of an enemy. He will not part with the new recruits of the North he is threatened with till they have a touch of his quality. He is one of the men who does not think about adds. He wants an effective army of respectable numbers, well drilled, well equipped, and confident in him. With such an army — and we believe he has it — he can do a deal of
s after the commissary stores were destroyed, but we succeeded in saving all of the medical stores and ammunition, both of which were very large. We also secured the depot and train of cars, both of which were well filled with provisions. The Yankees left behind all their knapsacks, a large quantity of arms, which they threw away, and lots of trinkets, which the boys have been examining all day. Having been on the march for twenty-two days, and all of the previous right, our General Stonewall allowed us to go into camp to rest, but I guess we will be off again in the morning in pursuit of the Yankees. In neither of the engagements we have not had one-fourth, no, not one sixth-four forces engaged, and I cannot see why the enemy have flee in such confusion, star so short a stand. I am happy to state that no Lynchburg was hurt in either engagement, and but very few of any other command. We captured a large number of stolen negroes. The Yankees had married a num
A General order from "Stonewall." The following order has been issued by Gen. Jackson relating to the recent gallant explor's of his army: Headquarters V. D. Winchester, May 26, 1862. General Orders No. 58. Within four weeks this army has made long and rapid to archer, fought six combats, and two battler, signally defeating the enemy in each one, captured several stands of colors and pieces of artillery, with numerous prisoners, and vast medical, ordnance, and army stores, and finally driven the boastful host, which was ravaging our beautiful country, into utter rout. The General Commanding would warmly express to the officers and men under his command his joy in their achievements, and his thanks for their brilliant gallantry in action, and their patient obedience under the hardships of forced massless, often more painful to the brave soldier than the dangers of battle. The explanation of the severe exertions to which the Commanding General called the army, wh
The Daily Dispatch: June 2, 1862., [Electronic resource], Virginians in the battle of Shiloh, (search)
Volunteers at the North. --The soil of Lincoln upon the Federal States to save the U. S. capital from "Stonewall" Jackson, created much excitement in New York. The N. Y. Seventh, the same regiment that visited Richmond, turned out 800 strong and were sent to Washington. In Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and Rhode Island a large number of troops enlisted to defend the "National" capital. It may be that "Stonewall" wont leave them a capital to defend. Volunteers at the North. --The soil of Lincoln upon the Federal States to save the U. S. capital from "Stonewall" Jackson, created much excitement in New York. The N. Y. Seventh, the same regiment that visited Richmond, turned out 800 strong and were sent to Washington. In Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and Rhode Island a large number of troops enlisted to defend the "National" capital. It may be that "Stonewall" wont leave them a capital to defend.