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Prisoners from Beauregard's army. --Several Abolition prisoners captured in the battle of Corinth, by General Beauregard's forces, heretofore quartered at Selma, Alabama, were brought to this city on Tuesday, in charge of Capt. Geo. W. Cary, of Alabama, and Capt. L. J. Jennings, of the 3d Louisiana Battalion, and lodged temporarily at a hotel on Main street. On yesterday, in obedience to an order from Gen. Winder, commanding the Department of Henrico, they were lodged in the C. S. MilitaryGeneral Beauregard's forces, heretofore quartered at Selma, Alabama, were brought to this city on Tuesday, in charge of Capt. Geo. W. Cary, of Alabama, and Capt. L. J. Jennings, of the 3d Louisiana Battalion, and lodged temporarily at a hotel on Main street. On yesterday, in obedience to an order from Gen. Winder, commanding the Department of Henrico, they were lodged in the C. S. Military Prison on Cary street. They may have been brought thither for the purpose of an exchange. The names given by the parties are Major W. M. Stone, U. S. A., (of Iowa), Col. Madison Miller, U. S. A., (of Missouri), and Capt. E. Gregg, U. S. A., (of Rock Island, Illinois.) We could hear nothing of any existing intention to send them to Salisbury, N. C., this morning with the other prisoners.
of the armies engaged. At "Borodino," considered one of Napoleon's most sanguinary battles, the destruction was only thirty per cent. --Hereafter, to have been at Shiloh will be among the proudest recollections and distinctions of the armies of the Confederacy. It will be pardoned to a Virginian's pride to exult that the old State was so numerously represented by her sons, who bore themselves with such conspicuous gallantry on that memorable day. The list has already been published, and Beauregard has made many of their names historic is his admirable report. But I cannot omit to repeat the mention of one widely known, and respected and beloved by very many friends, throughout the State. Robert W. Smith, now of Alabama, was captain of a splendid cavalry company, who acted as General Bragg's body guard. He was always in the thickest of the fight, as four horses shot under him fully testify. Captain Smith was frequently sent on hazardous and important duty, and with his men rallie
The Daily Dispatch: June 5, 1862., [Electronic resource], Expulsion of correspondents from the lines. (search)
r recently issued at Corinth, to which allusion has been made heretofore: 1. All newspaper and other correspondents are hereby ordered to leave this post by the first train; nor will they be permitted to return within twenty-five miles of the lines. 2. The Inspectors General of the army are especially charged with the execution of this order, both in relation to correspondents now here, or any others who may arrive. 3. Officers and soldiers are forbidden to write of the army in their correspondence; and the General commanding confidently relies on the patriotism of his troops for the faithful execution of this order. 4. All officers and privates absent from their post for seven days, without leave, shall be dropped from the rolls of the army, and be considered as deserters, and, when arrested, shall be punished as such. Their names will also be published in all the papers as such. By command of Gen. Beauregard. Geo. Wm. Brent, Acting Chief of Staff.