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The whereabouts of Gen. Jackson. Our contemporaries, both of the Yankee press and our own, seem to be much exercised on this subject. One thinks Jackson is at Winchester, another that he is at Martinsburg, a third that he is in Maryland, advancing upon Fredericktown, tearing up bridges as be goes and spreading terror among the Yankees generally. A gentleman who returned from the Valley a few days ago, reports him at Strasburg about the beginning of the present week; but who can tell wherJackson is at Winchester, another that he is at Martinsburg, a third that he is in Maryland, advancing upon Fredericktown, tearing up bridges as be goes and spreading terror among the Yankees generally. A gentleman who returned from the Valley a few days ago, reports him at Strasburg about the beginning of the present week; but who can tell where he may, be now? His movement are so rapid, that it is almost impossible to keep up with him. But of one thing we may feel assured, and that is that he is in the very place where he ought to be, let that place be what it may. The Lynchburg Republican says that at last accounts the enemy seemed to be gathering around him. Fremont from one quarter, Shields from another, and some other Yankee officer from a third.--A Yankee correspondent of the New York World predicts that he will be speedily ej
Private J P Craig, taken prisoner. Company F, Captain Lee.--Killed: Privates James Farney and G W Wooky. Wounded: Captain J E Lee, slightly; Lieut J O nattlebaum, severely; Sergeants W L Steedman, J Wathins; Corp Shealy, in thigh; Corp W M Jackson, severely; privates Atkinson, in leg; Allman, severely; Broyden, mortally; D. F Berr, severely; H H Jackson, mortally; J A Miller, in thigh; N B Steedman, slightly. Company G. Capt. J N Withers.--Lieut J W Carroll, Lieut Jas Black, Sergt G Jackson, mortally; J A Miller, in thigh; N B Steedman, slightly. Company G. Capt. J N Withers.--Lieut J W Carroll, Lieut Jas Black, Sergt G H O Farrall, privates J A Adams, D M Allison, D H Carroll, W F Dye, W K Hackot, Robt McCaw, H R Neal, Jas Wood, R R Robinson. O P Barron, W A Fewet, W W East, G T Hall, John Kersey, severely; Sergt J M Adams, Corp G L McElwee, privates J J Coward, D M Hope, F Jeffreys, C C Roberts, W E Rose, T C Williams, J S K Sims, slightly. Missing: H Surratt. Company H, Captain Martin.--Wounded: Lieut J J Brown, slightly; Serg't T C Brown slightly; Corp'l B T Martin, slightly; privates D Cash, A J Ge
A Lesson from history. The extract given below is taken from Plutarch's Lives, and will be bound interesting in view of the position of the contending armies. History is constantly repeating itself. The Fabius of yesterday is not unlike the Fabius of to-day, and Scipio of glorious memory is likely to find his antitype in our own Jackson: After Publius Cornelius Scipio, who was sent pro-consul into Spain, had driven the Carths gonfalons out of that province, and had reduced several towns and nations under the obedience of Rome, he was received at his coming home with a general joy and acclamation of the people; who, to show their gratitude and high esteem for him designed him consul for the year ensuing. Knowing what high expectation they had of him, he thought the design of only driving Hannibal out of Italy rot great enough to answer the hopes and the happiness they promised themselves from his consulship. He therefore proposed no less a task to himself than to make Ca
siege at Fort Pillow has been a long and a tedious one, but at last we congratulate ourselves that we see the beginning of the ending. Flag Officer Davis is, of course, discreet enough to keep his own counsel, but certain events have transpired within the last few days, which no one here could fail to observe, that unmistakably point to a speedy forward movement. The friends of the Union will be glad to hear this, for it must be confessed that, after the reduction of two such forts as Jackson and St. Phillip below, and two such fortifications as Columbus and Island No.10 above, it is rather humiliating that a contemptible earthwork like Pillow, manned, as we have every reason to believe — indeed, I many almost say know — by two regiments of raw troops and defended by not more than half a dozen guns of heavy calibre, should so long hold us at bay, and prevent the ed navigation of the Mississippi. It is a matter of little speculation whether Fort Pillow is defended at all. If t
al rumors were circulated through the streets yesterday regarding the movements of "Stonewall" Jackson. One of these was that he had returned to the vicinity of Front Royal, and had gained a victor large force. The first portion of this rumor is probably incorrect' although a battle between Jackson and the enemy may be expected any day. The triumphant march of our-army through the Valley, the or infamous, New York Seventh is reported. It is supposed that McDowell has been sent against Jackson, to cooperate with Fremont, Dix and Shields. Although the stores taken in the late battle have been sent to the rear, we have reason to suppose that Jackson still has his headquarters at Winchester, and that he is on the alert for any or all of the Yankee Generals now marching against himstores, superfluous baggage, and extra transportation, undoubtedly gave rise to the report that Jackson was retreating from the Valley. It is hardly possible that many days will pass by without brin