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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 172 16 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 152 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 120 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 113 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 107 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 106 6 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 106 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 102 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 89 15 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 68 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 11, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Fremont or search for Fremont in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 4 document sections:

e Military Committee, believes we have not to exceed 520,000. Where are the other 100,000 or 200,000. It was suggested in the House the other day that fraudulent pay-rolls have been forwarded to the Department. Here is a good subject for an Investigating Committee. We believe in Senator Wilson's figures, and they seem to be based upon an estimate like this; Gen. McClellan's column125,000 Gen. Halleck's column135,000 Gen. McDowell's column25,000 Gen. Banks's column75,000 Gen. Fremont's Department30,000 Gen. Burnside's Department75,000 Gen. Hunter's Department20,000 Gen. Brannan's (Key West, etc)5,000 Gen. Butler's column15,000 Gens Curtis and Steele20,000 Gens. Dex and Wool12,000 Gen. Blunt's Department of Kansas5,000 New Mexico and going10,000 Gen. Mitchell's column16,000 Guard duty in Ky and Tenn15,000 Guard duty in Missouri5,000 Guard duty below Island 105,000 Guarding prisoners North7,000 Total500,000 Now, from the above there should be deducted
nd demoralized and broken up, with his evacuation of Corinth, as to justify the conclusion that he will never be able to rally together again for battle fifty thousand of his late imposing force of one hundred and twenty thousand men. From Fremont. The news from Gen. Fremont's division yesterday reports the enemy at Mt. Jackson, with the Shenandoah river swollen so fearfully as to render pursuit of the rebels for the time impossible. The pontoon bridge, constructed to supply the plac that he will never be able to rally together again for battle fifty thousand of his late imposing force of one hundred and twenty thousand men. From Fremont. The news from Gen. Fremont's division yesterday reports the enemy at Mt. Jackson, with the Shenandoah river swollen so fearfully as to render pursuit of the rebels for the time impossible. The pontoon bridge, constructed to supply the place of the one burned by the rebels, was swept away, but the materials were all recovered.
. [from our Regular correspondent] Rockingham Co., Va., June 6. 1862 The day after my letter from Winchester intelligence reached "Old Stonewall," at Harper's Ferry, that a Federal column from the Northwest, probably headed by Milroy and Fremont, was trying to form a junction at Strasburg with Shields and McDowell's forces, and cut off his communication with the upper Valley, while Banks, collecting his scattered forces, and probably reinforced by Dix, would press upon him from Marylandwenty- five miles per day for saved days preceding, besides other duty, and others of them having been on the constant go for a much longer period. Not with standing this, old Stonewall turned off from the Valley pike on Sunday last and offered Fremont battle, which, after a slight skirmish, the latter declined. Jackson then returned to Strasburg, and kept in line of battle during the day, but the enemy declined to fight, though he constantly annoyed our rear. I expect he picked up some of o
has been victorious, and has completely routed the enemy, capturing six pieces of his artillery. The telegrams from other sources, published yesterday, announced that an attack had been made upon Jackson by the combined forces under Shields and Fremont, near Port Republic, in Rockingham county, the enemy appearing on the opposite bank of the North and Shenandoah rivers. The battle was a furious one, and the loss on both sides heavy; but our forces fought so desperately against the superior forsued by the cavalry, who were close upon their heels at the last accounts.--The battles occurred on Sunday and Monday, June 8th and 9th. Our losses in the engagements are upwards of five hundred, but the Federal loss is known to be more severe Fremont, who is blockading the roads in his retreat, is closely pressed by Ewell, and can hardly escape without the loss of many of his men. If Jackson had an adequate force, or even one equal to that of the enemy, the whole of these two invading armies