Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 23, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Picayune Butler or search for Picayune Butler in all documents.

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--The Appeal (published at Grenada, Miss.,) publishes an interesting letter from a lady, dated Memphis, June 10. We make an extract: Our town is full of all sorts of rumors, and we don't known what to believe. The stores are nearly all closed, the streets empty and quiet as on Sunday; no drays, no carriages, save now and then a lonely one going solemnly by as if to a funeral procession. The Yankees thus far are on very good behavior Col. Fitch, it is hoped, is not such a beast as Butler. So far as I can learn, not a scrap of a Federal flag has yet been hung out save by the invaders them selves, and not a single instance of a Memphian reading the enemy cordially, if I may except that of my little three year old boy. Yesterday he was standing on the side walk and a squad of Yankees passed by him. The little rascal rang in among them in most cordial manner shouted, at the top of his lungs, "Howdy, soldier! howdy, soldier! howdy, soldier!" shaking hands with half a dozen of
Picayune Boiler sold. --The following incident in the career of Picayune Butler in New Orleans may be deemed a proper succedaneum of his infamous order with reference to the ladies of that city: A few days since preparations were making for a dress parade, and a number of officers had congregated in front of the St. Charles, Butler's headquarters. A splendid carriage was driven in front of the hotel, accompanied by servants in livery — the whole affair betokening an ownership of great wealth and excellent taste. The occupant, dressed in the latest fashion and sparkling with jewelry, drew from her pocket a gold card case, and taking therefrom her card, sent it up to Butler's rooms. The next day himself and lady called at the residence indicated on the card — a fine mansion in a fashionable part of the city — where a couple of hours were agreeably spent in conversation, followed by the introduction of wine and cake, when the highly delighted visitors took their departur<
Butter and Farragut. --A prominent Confederate naval officer asserted recently in Vicksburg that Com. Farragut and General Butler a quarrel in New Orleans recently about the infamous proclamation of the latter. Com. Farragut denounced it as inhuman and without parallel, and stated that the Federal Government would never apphat the Federal Government would never approve it. It is also stated that Farragut threatened to withdraw his fleet from the city and leave Butler to the tender mercies of the inhabitants unless he modified the barbarous edict. Should Farragut do this, Butler and his followers would soon fall like "ripe corn before the reaper." hat the Federal Government would never approve it. It is also stated that Farragut threatened to withdraw his fleet from the city and leave Butler to the tender mercies of the inhabitants unless he modified the barbarous edict. Should Farragut do this, Butler and his followers would soon fall like "ripe corn before the reaper."