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rce retreated, the pursuit being kept up for a distance of some five miles. Heavy and rapid firing was heard after midnight, and the supposition is that a battle took place immediately on the Rappahannock river, near the line of Fauquier county. The prisoners were sent back to Gordonsville, whence they were transferred by railroad to Richmond, guarded by a detachment of the 1st Maryland regiment, under Capt. Wm. Goldsborough. According to the statements of prisoners, the force under Pope amounts to 40,000 men. Gen. C. S. Winder was a nephew of Gen. John H. Winder, the commander of the Department of Henrico, and was probably the youngest Brigadier in the Confederate army. The city was full of rumors yesterday of a battle on Sunday, but after the most diligent inquiry we could learn nothing definite concerning it. Certain it is, that heavy firing was heard in the direction of the Rappahannock after midnight, (Saturday,) and again for a brief period on Sunday morn
Wilful Ignorance, An officer who accompanied to this city the soldiers of Pope's command, who were captured in the skirmish on Friday says that he inquired of one of the Yankee officers of the party whether he had read the proclamation of President Davis and the order of the Adjutant General with reference to the treatment they were to receive. They promptly replied that their business was to obey orders, and not read the proclamations of Jeff. Davis.
Arrival of prisoners from Pope's army. --The Central train that arrived at 4 o'clock yesterday morning brought to this city three hundred and three of Pope's Hessians, captured on Saturday, near Southwest Mountain, by the advance forces of Gen Jackson's army. Accompanying the above were Brig-Gen. H. Prince, a Yankee GeneralPope's Hessians, captured on Saturday, near Southwest Mountain, by the advance forces of Gen Jackson's army. Accompanying the above were Brig-Gen. H. Prince, a Yankee General, and twenty seven commissioned officers, who, together with the men, were lodged in the Libby Prison. Prince, for a few hours, was lodged at the Exchange Hotel. The President's recent proclamation declared Pope and his commissioned satellites to be without the usages of warfare, and not entitled to the privileges of ordinary prPope and his commissioned satellites to be without the usages of warfare, and not entitled to the privileges of ordinary prisoners of war Orders were issued to place all of the captured officers in close confinement. At the Libby Prison they were put with the deserters and other persons to whom infamy attaches. An examination was made into the condition of the county jail, with a view to their incarceration there; but the structure was deemed unsafe
in the office connected with the affair, have been arrested. The four principals have been sent to Fort McHenry. It was evidently Jones's intention to escape the officers of the Government by leaving for distant parts this morning. It is said to be in contemplation to stop the issue of the Patriot and Union, by Government authority. From Washington. Washington, August 7. --The Confederates are concentrating their forces at Gordonsville, with the intention of attacking Pope. Several Governors of the loyal States are here to-day in consultation with the President in relation to the new orders for drafting. Gov. Buckingham, of Conn., arrived this morning. Another trial of strength between projectiles and iron plates is about to take place on James river.--The 12 and 15 inch guns which Gen. McClellan is provided with will, it is thought, sink any craft, whether of iron or wood, that can float. Doctors' certificates of no avail. The Albany Evenin
Pope's captured officers. We understand that the officers of Pope's command, lately taken prisoners by Stonewall Jackson, professed never to have heard of President Davis a late proclamation with reference to the commissioned brigands of that aPope's command, lately taken prisoners by Stonewall Jackson, professed never to have heard of President Davis a late proclamation with reference to the commissioned brigands of that army, and declared that they had supposed they were engaged in civilized warfare! This is the coolest thing of the season. A civilized warfare! They burn down our houses' destroy our property, insult our women arm the contrabands against us, hang aral sense of the world. We trust most devoutly that Old Stonewall may succeed in capturing the arch fiend and savage, Pope himself. If he were not as fleet of foot as black in heart, we might anticipate a luxury, compared with which the captures fleet of foot as black in heart, we might anticipate a luxury, compared with which the capture of a thousand other Yankee Generals would be dull and insipid. Pope and Butler! If those two precious miscreants could only fall into Southern hands!