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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 194 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 74 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 74 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 72 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 66 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 47 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 33 1 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 26, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for West Point (Georgia, United States) or search for West Point (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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The army worm. --A private letter from West Point, Ga., states that a destructive worm, similar to the "army worm," had appeared in that vicinity, and was eating up the fodder, pea vines, and grass; was covering the face of the land, getting into the houses, among the clothes, beds, &c.