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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,078 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 442 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 430 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 324 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 306 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 284 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 254 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 150 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 20, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Maryland (Maryland, United States) or search for Maryland (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 17 results in 7 document sections:

ttle-field — the soldiers on the way — Female heroism — Affairs in Maryland--a charge on Jackson's staff — the living in Maryland, &c., &c. Maryland, &c., &c. Winchester, Sept. 15th, 1862. If I knew what news you are in possession of — If I only had four file up to date — I would know betfrom Richmond to over lake our army, which Invariably crossed into Maryland a country's separated from us, and reached only with labor and . A not even hear them."--She was then dismissed. Gen. Lee is in Maryland. He has issued a model proclamation, promising no interference inbeen opposed to our entering the State. Gen. Jackson, on reaching Maryland, was presented by a citizen with a splendid charger, which proved operations, our whole army will doubtless move to the interior of Maryland. Saturday night, Ex-Gov. Lowe made a thrilling speech here. He said Maryland, long disappointed, had been perfectly taken by surprise on the entrance of our army and that when it was seen to be no mere
Capture of Harper's Ferry — the battle in Maryland. From the moment that our armies testified their great superiority to the Yankees at Bethel and Manassas, we saw and said that their true policy was to assume the offensive, and never to depart from it. A contrary policy produced a series of disasters which brought the Confederacy to the verge of destruction, and had it not been abandoned at last, we are not sure that we should not, in the end, have become a subjugated and an enslaved peopd, and defeated a Hungarian army of 80,000 men. The third was that of Prince Eugene at Belgrade. As far as we can understand the operations, from the very imperfect accounts which we have received, they were somewhat as follows: Our army in Maryland is divided into three corps, commanded by Generals Jackson, Longstreet and Hill. Of these corps Jackson's was engaged in the siege of Harper's Ferry, and the other two covered his operations. Conceiving it to be of great importance to raise th
The battle in Maryland--McClellan again defeated. The reports with reference to the battle fought in Maryland on Sunday and Monday very as to particulars, but concur in the statement that the enemy was repulsed after Gen. Hill was reinforced by Longstreet. The fight is said to have occurred at or near Middletown, in Frederick City, on the old National road and about fifteen miles from Hagerstown. The most reliable statement we have in reference to the engagement is, that the fight commMaryland on Sunday and Monday very as to particulars, but concur in the statement that the enemy was repulsed after Gen. Hill was reinforced by Longstreet. The fight is said to have occurred at or near Middletown, in Frederick City, on the old National road and about fifteen miles from Hagerstown. The most reliable statement we have in reference to the engagement is, that the fight commenced between Gen. D. H. Hills's division, 15,000 strong and the divisions of McClellan, Burnside, and Sieged, amounting in all to some 80,000 men. The Federal force attacked and surrounded Hill, who maintained his position with changing fortune until night when he was reinforced by Longstreet's division. The next day the fight was renewed, and the heavy columns of McClellan driven three three miles from the battle-field. The troops under Gen. Hill are said to have suffered considerably, but o
The Daily Dispatch: September 20, 1862., [Electronic resource], Camp star Martinsburg, Sept. 12th, 1862. (search)
alf a mile, and to me, whilst observing the passage of the troops, it seems as if I was suddenly transported to the times of ancient history. The whole river seemed alive with troops pressing forward, each eager to place his foot on the soil of Maryland before his comrades. The next day we entered Frederick City to the great joy of many good hearts, who had been long looking anxiously for our coming. We captured a considerable amount of hospital and army stores; also, some 200 or 300 sicke month during the skirmish. The enemy retreated from Martinsburg to Harper's Ferry yesterday, where, no doubt, they will be compelled to make a stand. It is thought that their whole force at that place will be captured. The trip into Maryland was a very fortunate one for us. Most of the troops have provided them selves with good shoes, clothes, &c. It was quite diverting the day we entered Frederick to see the boys eating watermelons. They were the first we had seen, and there were
The Daily Dispatch: September 20, 1862., [Electronic resource], Camp star Martinsburg, Sept. 12th, 1862. (search)
In Walker's division we had five killed, three of these by the accidental explosion of a shell. Among the killed in this division we have heard the name of Lieut. Robertson, of French's battery. Latter. Since the above was written we have received the following additional particulars contained in a letter to Gov. Letcher, from Col. Francis H. Smith: Winchester, Sept. 16--After the advance of our army to Frederick, and the issuing of the admirable proclamation to the people of Maryland by Lee, a movement took place with our troops, seemingly in the direction of Pennsylvania, but really for an important movement into Virginia. After sending a portion of his troops to occupy and hold the Maryland Heights, Gen. Jackson was directed by Gen. Lee to recross the Potomac at Williamsport, take possession of Martinsburg, and then pass rapidly behind Harper's Ferry, that a capture might be effected of the garrison and stores known to be there. The movement was admirably conducted.
The Maryland press. We have received, through the politeness of Dr. King, who has just gotten through from Washington, a copy of the St. Mary's Beacon, published at Leonardtown, Md. This paper, which has always been very bold in its utterances against the Lincoln despotism, in concluding a sarcastic article on the "victories" of the Federal army, says: "Notwithstanding all these splendid victories and this unheard-of gallantry, the invincible Federal forces who were once at Warrenton are now behind the fortifications upon Arlington Heights." In noticing the entrance of our troops into Maryland, it says that many strong Unionists showed them every attention, selling them food, clothing, and articles of luxury, for United States or Confederate money. Dr. King says that in Washington the Secessionists were delighted at the disasters to the Federal army, but the Unionists were consoling themselves that the Confederate army was now in a position where the "back- bone of the rebellion
imary an act of self-defence as to relieve those who would serve and save it from chatted servitude to those who are wading through seas of blood to subvert and destroy it. Future generations will with difficulty realize that there could have been hesitation on this point. Sixty years of general and boundless subserviency to the slave power do not adequately explain it. Mr. President, I beseech you to open your eyes to the fact that the devotees of slavery everywhere — just as much in Maryland as in Mississippi, in Washington, as in Richmond — are to-day your enemies and the implacable foes of every effort to reestablish the national authority by the discomfiture of its assailants. Their President is not Abraham Lincoln, but Jefferson Davis. You may draft them to serve in the war; but they will only fight under the rebel flag. There is not in New York to-day a man who really believes in slavery loves it, and desires its perpetuation, who heartily desires the crushing out of re